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Department of the Army                                                                   *TRADOC Regulation 10-5

Headquarters, United States Army

Training and Doctrine Command

Fort Monroe, Virginia  23651-1047

 

22 December 2005

 

Organization and Functions

U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

______________________________________________________________________________

SummaryThis regulation prescribes the organization, mission, and functions of the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).  This is a major revision incorporating changes from various reorganizations and command decisions.

 

Applicability.  This regulation applies to all elements of TRADOC.

 

Supplementation.  Supplementation of this regulation is prohibited unless specifically approved by the Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff (ATCS), 7 Fenwick Road, Fort Monroe, VA 23651-1049.

 

Suggested improvements.  The lead responsibility for this regulation is the Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS) for Operations and Training (DCSOPS&T).  Send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recommended changes to Publications and Blank Forms) or DA Form 1045 (Army Ideas for Excellence Program (AIEP) Proposal) through channels to Commander, TRADOC (ATTG-ZA), 5 Fenwick Road, Fort Monroe, VA 23651-1067.

 

Availability.  This publication is distributed solely through the TRADOC Homepage at

http://www.tradoc.army.mil/tpubs/regndx.htm.

______________________________________________________________________________

Contents

 

                                                                                                                        Paragraph                Page

 

Chapter 1

Introduction

Purpose.................................................................................................................... 1-1              5

References............................................................................................................... 1-2              5

Explanation of abbreviations and terms...................................................................... 1-3              5

Responsibilities......................................................................................................... 1-4              5

Scope...................................................................................................................... 1-5              6

Policy....................................................................................................................... 1-6              6

General organizational requirements........................................................................... 1-7              7

__________________________________________________________________________

*This regulation supersedes TRADOC Regulation 10-5, 9 March 2005.

 

 

Contents (cont)

 

                                                                                                                        Paragraph                Page

 

Chapter 2

Organization, Functions, and Designation of Responsibilities

Mission of TRADOC............................................................................................... 2-1              7

Organization of TRADOC........................................................................................ 2-2              7

Core competencies................................................................................................... 2-3              9

Core functions.......................................................................................................... 2-4              9

Key enablers............................................................................................................ 2-5            13

Command and control relationships........................................................................... 2-6            15

Senior leader roles.................................................................................................... 2-7            19

 

Chapter 3

Headquarters TRADOC

 

Section I - Organization of HQ TRADOC

Command group....................................................................................................... 3-1            20

Personal staff............................................................................................................ 3-2            20

Coordinating staff..................................................................................................... 3-3            21

Special staff.............................................................................................................. 3-4            21

Field Operating Activities.......................................................................................... 3-5            21

 

Section II - Headquarters TRADOC Command Group

Commanding General............................................................................................... 3-6            21

Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff.............................................................. 3-7            21

Commander's Planning Group.................................................................................. 3-8            21

Command Sergeant Major........................................................................................ 3-9            21

Strategic Communications......................................................................................... 3-10          22

Secretary of the General Staff................................................................................... 3-11          22

Chief, Congressional Activities Office........................................................................ 3-12          23

FORSCOM/TRADOC Liaison Office...................................................................... 3-13          24

 

Section III - Other DCGs

General responsibilities.............................................................................................. 3-14          24

Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms responsibilities.................................. 3-15          25

Deputy Commanding General, Futures responsibilities............................................... 3-16          25

Deputy Commanding General, Initial Military Training responsibilities......................... 3-17          26

Deputy Commanding General, Army National Guard................................................. 3-18          26

Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve.................................................... 3-19          27

 

Section IV - Headquarters TRADOC Personal Staff

Chief of Public Affairs............................................................................................... 3-20          28

Command Chaplain.................................................................................................. 3-21          29

Contents (cont)

 

                                                                                                                        Paragraph                Page

 

Inspector General..................................................................................................... 3-22          30

Staff Judge Advocate................................................................................................ 3-23          31

 

Section V - Headquarters TRADOC Coordinating Staff

Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence......................................................................... 3-24          32

Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Training...................................................... 3-25          35

Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Infrastructure, and Logistics............................... 3-26          38

Deputy Chief of Staff for Resource Management....................................................... 3-27          39

Chief Information Officer.......................................................................................... 3-28          40

 

Section VI - Headquarters TRADOC Special Staff

Command Equal Employment Opportunity Officer.................................................... 3-29          42

Command Historian.................................................................................................. 3-30          43

Command Safety Officer.......................................................................................... 3-31          44

Command Surgeon................................................................................................... 3-32          45

Internal Review and Audit Compliance...................................................................... 3-33          47

 

Chapter 4

TRADOC Futures Center

Mission of TRADOC FC......................................................................................... 4-1            47

Organization of TRADOC FC.................................................................................. 4-2            47

Lead responsibilities of TRADOC FC....................................................................... 4-3            48

Assist responsibilities of TRADOC FC..................................................................... 4-4            50

 

Chapter 5

U.S. Army Accessions Command

Mission of USAAC.................................................................................................. 5-1            51

Organization of USAAC........................................................................................... 5-2            51

Lead responsibilities of USAAC............................................................................... 5-3            51

Assist responsibilities of USAAC.............................................................................. 5-4            52

 

Chapter 6

U.S. Army Combined Arms Center

Mission of CAC....................................................................................................... 6-1            52

Organization of CAC................................................................................................ 6-2            52

Lead responsibilities of CAC.................................................................................... 6-3            53

Assist responsibilities of CAC................................................................................... 6-4            56

 

Chapter 7

U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command

Mission of CASCOM.............................................................................................. 7-1            57

 

Contents (cont)

 

                                                                                                                        Paragraph                Page

 

Organization of CASCOM....................................................................................... 7-2            57

Lead responsibilities of CASCOM............................................................................ 7-3            58

Assist responsibilities of CASCOM.......................................................................... 7-4            59

 

Chapter 8

U.S. Army War College

Mission of USAWC................................................................................................. 8-1            60

Organization of USAWC.......................................................................................... 8-2            61

Lead responsibilities of USAWC.............................................................................. 8-3            61

Assist responsibilities of USAWC............................................................................. 8-4            61

 

Chapter 9

TRADOC Analysis Center

Mission of TRAC..................................................................................................... 9-1            62

Organization of TRAC.............................................................................................. 9-2            62

Lead responsibilities of TRAC.................................................................................. 9-3            62

Assist responsibilities of TRAC................................................................................. 9-4            63

 

Chapter 10

U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency

Mission of USANCA............................................................................................... 10-1          64

Organization of USANCA........................................................................................ 10-2          64

Lead responsibilities of USANCA............................................................................ 10-3          64

Assist responsibilities of USANCA........................................................................... 10-4          65

 

Chapter 11

U.S. Army Aeronautical Services Agency

Mission of USAASA................................................................................................ 11-1          65

Organization of USAASA......................................................................................... 11-2          65

 

Chapter 12

Coordinating Instructions

Coordination and taskings......................................................................................... 12-1          66

Supporting regulations............................................................................................... 12-2          67

 

Appendix

A.  References.......................................................................................................                  68

 

 

 


Contents (cont)

 

                                                                                                                                                           Page

Table List

 

Table 2-1:  Core function and key enabler lead designations......................................                  15

Table 12-1:  TR 10-5-series regulations....................................................................                  67

 

Figure List

 

Figure 2-1:  TRADOC organization..........................................................................                    9

Figure 4-1:  TRADOC Futures Center......................................................................                  48

Figure 5-1:  U.S. Army Accessions Command..........................................................                  51

Figure 6-1:  Combined Arms Center.........................................................................                  53

Figure 7-1:  Combined Arms Support Command......................................................                  58

Figure 8-1:  U. S. Army War College........................................................................                  61

Figure 9-1:  TRADOC Analysis Center.....................................................................                  62

 

Glossary.................................................................................................................                  70

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 1

Introduction

 

1-1.  Purpose.  This regulation is TRADOC's capstone document that defines and delineates organizations, functions, and responsibilities for the headquarters (HQ) staff and subordinate organizations.

 

1-2.  ReferencesAppendix A contains the related publications.

 

1-3.  Explanation of abbreviations and terms.  The glossary contains abbreviations and explanations of terms used in this regulation.

 

1-4.  Responsibilities.

 

    a.  The Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff (DCG/CofS).  The DCG/CofS will approve changes to this regulation and the supporting regulations, TRADOC Regulation (TR) 10-5-X.

 

    b.  The Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Training.  The DCSOPS&T will:

 

         (1)  Serve as the lead for this regulation.

 

         (2)  Review and coordinate proposed changes and forward recommendations for approval to the DCG/CofS.

    c.  The Deputy Chief of Staff for Resource Management (DCSRM).  The DCSRM will:

 

         (1)  Advise and assist organizations on organizational and functional alignment.

 

         (2)  Review proposed changes for organization, standardization, format, adequacy of statement of responsibilities and functions, and affect on resources to assist the DCSOPS&T.

 

    d.  Headquarters TRADOC staff and commanders of TRADOC organizations.  The staff and commanders will ensure that definitions of the organizational structure, functions, and responsibilities shown in this regulation are current and accurate.  Given the dynamic nature of military transformation and the operational environment, each organization will routinely undertake a critical analysis and review of its structure, functions, and responsibilities.  Annual update of this regulation will integrate these results.  This will ensure TRADOC remains an agile, innovative organization.

 

1-5.  Scope.

 

    a.  This regulation focuses on the organization, functions, and responsibilities at the highest levels of TRADOC.  It describes TRADOC's major organizational structure; core functions; major responsibilities for HQ TRADOC, the major subordinate commands (MSCs), field operating activities (FOAs), and special activities; and relationships between these organizations and their assigned responsibilities.

 

    b.  Headquarters, TRADOC, each MSC, TRADOC Futures Center (FC), U.S. Army War College (USAWC), and the TRADOC Analysis Center (TRAC) will each have a separate supporting regulation written (TR 10-5-X) to describe that organization's structure, core functions, major responsibilities for its subordinate organizations, and relationships between these organizations and their assigned responsibilities.  Army Regulation (AR) 10-16 describes U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency's (USANCA) structure, functions, and major responsibilities.

 

    c.  This capstone regulation and supporting regulations describe how TRADOC supports the functions assigned to the Department of the Army (DA) in Title 10, United States Code, and in Department of Defense (DoD) Directive 5100.1.

 

1-6.  Policy.

 

    a.  Decentralize responsibility for missions and tasks to TRADOC's MSCs, the HQ TRADOC staff, and special activities to the maximum extent possible.

 

    b.  The HQ TRADOC staff exists to assist the Commanding General (CG), TRADOC in accomplishing the mission by providing staff management, planning, and coordination capabilities.  The command group and special staff elements provide professional and technical services and advice.

 

    c.  In all matters, the staff acts through the DCG/CofS, who acts on behalf of the CG, TRADOC.

 

1-7.  General organizational requirements.  Each TRADOC organization structures units to facilitate effective and efficient mission accomplishment; assigns specific functional responsibilities to each organizational element oriented toward accomplishing missions; groups similar functions; eliminates functions and structures that become non-essential; consolidates functions and responsibilities where feasible and economical; and eliminates duplicate or fragmented functions that do not support assigned missions.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 2

Organization, Functions, and Designation of Responsibilities

 

2-1.  Mission of TRADOC.  The mission of TRADOC is to recruit, train, and educate the Army's Soldiers; develop leaders; support training in units; develop doctrine; establish standards; and build the future Army.

 

2-2.  Organization of TRADOC.  TRADOC is a major Army command (MACOM) consisting of HQ TRADOC, three MSCs, and eight special activities.  All TRADOC centers and schools are aligned under an MSC, except USAWC and TRAC.  The MSCs have direct authority over the centers and schools aligned under them and are the linkage with non-TRADOC schools (see fig 2-1, below).

 

    a.  The HQ TRADOC staff consists of a command group, personal staff, coordinating staff, and special staff, with several FOAs in support of the coordinating staff.  Although established as a field operating activity, the TRADOC FC is an integral part of, and functions as an element of, the HQ TRADOC staff.

 

    b.  The HQ TRADOC staff provides staff management, facilitates external coordination, and assists the DCG/CofS in the prioritization of resources.  It ensures the coordination and integration of doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, and facilities (DOTMLPF) initiatives and functions between external commands and organizations, and the TRADOC MSCs and special activities.  The HQ TRADOC staff is the primary interface with external agencies (DoD, Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA), joint organizations, other Services, and other external agencies and organizations) to provide TRADOC positions and receive taskings and requests for support.

 

    c.  TRADOC's MSCs are:

 

  • U.S. Army Accessions Command
  • U.S. Army Combined Arms Center
  • U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command

 

    d.  Direct authority is the broad authority to act on matters relating to the execution of an organization's assigned missions and functions.  The latitude direct authority provides is bounded by the overall commander's vision, priorities, and guidance, both written and verbal.  Direct authority is a measure of control less than that included in command and more than that included in administrative control (ADCON).  Direct authority provides a leader the ability to influence the activities and initiatives of subordinate organizations, but not direct day-to-day operations.

 

    e.  TRADOC MSCs, centers, and schools receive taskings through the approved command tasking procedure outlined in chapter 12, paragraph 12-1.  Supporting TRADOC 10-5-X regulations will contain additional guidance outlining the interaction between centers and schools, their respective MSCs, and external organizations (see para 1-5, above and para 12-2, below).

 

    f.  The special activities subordinate to TRADOC are:

 

         (1)  Directly reporting to HQ TRADOC:

 

·        U.S. Army War College.

·        TRADOC Analysis Center.

·        U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency.

·        U.S. Army Aeronautical Services Agency (USAASA).

 

         (2)  Directly reporting to a MSC:

 

·        Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC).

·        Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC).

·        U.S. Disciplinary Barracks (USDB).

Figure 2-1.  TRADOC organization

 

2-3.  Core competencies.  TRADOC accomplishes its mission through the building and sustaining of core competencies.  TRADOC's core competencies represent commandwide capabilities created from the combined skills, knowledge, abilities, and behaviors of its Soldiers and civilians operating as individuals or members of teams.  The command's mission determines these enduring qualities, built through many years of successfully meeting the Army's requirements, coupled with a process of continuous improvement and innovation.  TRADOC's three core competencies:

 

    a.  Recruit quality people, train Soldiers, and develop leaders.

 

    b.  Prepare the Army to dominate land combat in a joint warfight.

 

    c.  Design, develop, and integrate warfighting requirements; foster innovation; and lead change.

 

2-4.  Core functions.  TRADOC has 11 core functions.  TRADOC must perform these core functions to fulfill its mission for the Army.  Core functions are those critical major functions one or more organizations perform that accomplish TRADOC's mission.  Core functions are derived, sustainable components integral to the core competencies.  The core functions lay out the foundation or blueprint for designing the organization and assigning roles and responsibilities.  Core functions rest within the core competency they support.

 

    a.  Core competency:  Recruit quality people, train Soldiers, and develop leaders.

 

         (1)  Core function # 1:  Recruit.

 

               (a)  Execute accession of the officer, warrant officer, and enlisted populations into the Regular Army (RA) and the U.S. Army Reserve (USAR).

 

               (b)  Consists of worldwide enlisted, officer, and special mission recruiting operations for the RA, the USAR, the Army Medical Department, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), Officer Candidate School (OCS), Warrant Officer Candidate School, the Judge Advocate General Corps, and the Chaplain Corps.

 

         (2)  Core function # 2:  Initial Military Training (IMT).

 

               (a)  Set standards for and provide training in the basic skills, knowledge, and task proficiencies needed to become a Soldier and subsequently to succeed as a member of an Army unit, contribute to unit mission accomplishment, and survive on the battlefield.

 

               (b)  Consists of basic combat training (BCT); one station unit training (OSUT); advanced individual training (AIT); ROTC; OCS; basic officer leadership courses (BOLC) I-III; and recruiter, drill sergeant, and other cadre training.  Also consists of setting standards and ensuring execution to standard for individual training, including individual training in all units, for those skills and tasks inherent in the IMT core function.  Initial entry training (IET) consists of the portions of IMT that pertain to enlisted Soldiers - BCT, OSUT, and AIT.  Initial military training includes IET plus officer precommissioning training in ROTC, the U.S. Military Academy, and OCS and officer entry training in BOLC.

 

         (3)  Core function # 3:  Functional training.

 

               (a)  Set standards for and conduct skill training, outside of IMT, to qualify individuals for assignment to duty positions that require specific functional skills and knowledge.

 

               (b)  Consists of developing products and conducting training for Soldiers to perform critical tasks and supporting skills and knowledge required to perform a specialty or functional job.  This includes training which qualifies individuals for award of a skill identifier, special qualifications identifier, or additional skill identifier.  Also includes setting standards and ensuring execution to standard for individual training, including individual training in all units, for those skills and tasks inherent in the functional training core function.

 

         (4)  Core function # 4:  Leader development and education.

 

               (a)  Set standards, make assessments and recommendations to the Army, and execute Army leader development programs focusing on the total education of Soldiers and Army civilians to meet current and future leadership requirements in a joint, interagency, and multinational (JIM) environment.  Set standards for individual and leader tasks, less IMT.

 

               (b)  Consists of creating Armywide leader development concepts, doctrine, programs of instruction, strategies, training, and education; and includes training officers, warrant officers, noncommissioned officers (NCO), and civilian supervisors to perform in leadership (supervisory) roles.  Training includes job-specific skills, as well as tasks that provide a leader with the skills to motivate, counsel, and care for subordinates.  The principal leader development and education systems are Officer Education System (OES), Warrant Officer Education System (WOES), Noncommissioned Officer Education System (NCOES), and Civilian Education System (CES).  These education systems instill leaders with the cognitive ability to think through complex, unexpected, and ambiguous problems in order to develop solutions.  Also consists of setting standards and ensuring execution to standard for individual training, including individual training in all units, for those skills and tasks inherent in the leader development and education core function.

 

    b.  Core competency:  Prepare the Army to dominate land combat in a joint warfight.

 

         (1)  Core function # 5:  Lessons learned.

 

               (a)  Obtain and process tactical- through strategic-level observations, insights, and lessons to define DOTMLPF implications leading to actionable solutions.

 

               (b)  Consists of collecting, analyzing, disseminating, and archiving observations, insights, and lessons; tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP); and research and special study materials.  Also includes working with the Army's proponents to determine DOTMLPF implications from lessons learned and integrating products from Army activities and the JIM environment into proponent action plans that produce solutions to key issues.

 

         (2)  Core function # 6:  Collective training.

 

               (a)  Develop the Army's collective training standards and strategies; determine the Army's collective training requirements; and manage programs to enable crews, teams, staffs, and units to conduct the full range of military operations in the contemporary operational environment.

 

               (b)  Consists of managing, developing policy for, and resourcing the Army Combat Training Center (CTC) Program (Battle Command Training Program (BCTP) and the maneuver CTCs); executing the BCTP; managing the Army's live, virtual, and constructive training environments (LVC TE) and enablers and linking them to the joint LVC TE; developing virtual and constructive training simulations; conducting joint air-ground training; developing and sustaining collective training management doctrine and enablers; managing training development for battle command and battle staff training; and coordinating the linkages between individual and collective training.

 

         (3)  Core function # 7:  Doctrine.

 

               (a)  Develop and integrate land forces warfighting doctrine and ensure consistency of Army doctrinal publications by considering joint, multi-Service, and multinational doctrine and national policy and guidance.

 

               (b)  Consists of researching, authoring, coordinating, and publishing field manuals, the Army Universal Task List, and assigned joint doctrine.  Prepares doctrinal publications; performs management, integration, and quality control of Army doctrine; integrates Army doctrine vertically and horizontally; integrates Army doctrine with joint and multinational doctrine; and represents the Army in multinational doctrine forums.

 

         (4)  Core function # 8:  Training support.

 

               (a)  Training Support encompasses the training information infrastructures, products and materials, personnel, services, and facilities to enable training that develops and sustains Soldier and leader competence across the institutional, operational, and self-development training domains.

 

               (b)  Consists of functions that may take place as a part of training support.  Examples are design, development, acquisition, production, reproduction, distribution, maintenance, accountability, and sustainment of training products and materials; training scheduling; and student record maintenance for Army individual and unit training.  Also includes training support products, services, and facilities.  Examples are instrumentation; training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations (TADSS); training ammunition; training publications; visual information management; and multimedia products; visual information services; range design, targetry and instrumentation acquisition; classroom modernization.  The descriptions and examples given in this paragraph are not all inclusive.

 

    c.  Core competency:  Design, develop, and integrate warfighting requirements; foster innovation; and lead change.

 

         (1)  Core function # 9:  Concepts.

 

               (a)  Develop concepts to lead Joint Capability Integration and Development System (JCIDS).  Concepts illustrate how future forces will operate, describe the capabilities required to carry out a range of military operations against adversaries in the expected joint operational environment, and how a commander, using military art and science, might employ these capabilities to achieve desired effects and objectives.

 

               (b)  Consists of future capabilities descriptions within a proposed structure of future military operations for a period of 10-20 years.  Each concept describes problems to solve, the components of potential solutions, and how those components work together to solve the problems.

 

         (2)  Core function # 10:  Experimentation.

 

               (a)  Explore innovative methods of operating, especially to assess their feasibility, evaluate their utility, or determine their limits to reduce risk in the current force (today's operations) and the future force (developments).  Experimentation identifies and verifies acceptable solutions for required changes in DOTMLPF to achieve significant advances in current and future capabilities.

 

               (b)  Consists of reducing risk to developments and Soldiers by conducting concept development and prototype experiments providing credible analytical underpinnings to support decision making for the current and future force.  Applies structured assessment procedures to substantiate the effects of proposed warfighting capabilities, using discovery, hypothesis-testing, and demonstration approaches as appropriate.  Refines operational concepts, develop DOTMLPF capability requirements, and assesses potential DOTMLPF capability solutions through analysis based on experiments using venues supporting the appropriate level of resolution.  Venues may range from wargaming (principally used for concept development) through integrated live, virtual, and constructive experiments.

 

         (3)  Core function # 11:  Requirements determination.

 

               (a)  Assess capabilities to identify gaps and develop integrated DOTMLPF requirements to resolve or mitigate those gaps.

 

               (b)  Consists of determining, recommending priorities, and documenting changes in doctrine, organizational design, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, and facilities requirements, as well as supporting analysis.  These requirements result from JCIDS, Operational Needs Statements, operational lessons learned, and senior leadership decisions to spin future capabilities into the current force.  Initial capabilities documents (ICD), capability development documents (CDD), capability production documents (CPD), and DOTMLPF change recommendations (DCR) formally document these requirements.

 

2-5.  Key enablers.  There are functions within TRADOC that underpin the ability to execute two or more core functions.  Multiple organizations or processes across TRADOC require these enablers in order to successfully accomplish core functions.  TRADOC has three key enablers.

 

    a.  Key enabler # 1:  Operational architecture.

 

         (1)  Portrays an operational warfighting concept.  Provides a description (often graphical) of the operational elements, assigned tasks, and information flows required to accomplish or support a warfighting function.  It defines the type of information, the frequency of exchange, and the tasks these information exchanges support.  Architecture provides a systemic way of presenting a concept to system developers, a framework for conducting capabilities-based assessment, and the tools for promoting interoperability.

 

         (2)  Consists of information and data derived from warfighting concepts and required capabilities that provide descriptions of the total aggregation of missions, functions, and tasks.  It describes the interrelationships between operational elements, type of information requirements/flows, frequency of exchanges, and tasks these exchanges support.  It supports the decision process associated with JCIDS.

 

    b.  Key enabler # 2:  Modeling and simulations (M&S).

 

         (1)  Fuses live, virtual, and constructive models, which include stimulators, emulators, and prototypes to investigate, understand, or provide experiential stimulus to conceptual systems that do not exist, or real-life systems which cannot accept experimentation or observation because of resource, range, security, or safety limitations.

 

         (2)  Consists of investigation in a synthetic environment to gain understanding that supports decisions in the three M&S domains:  Research, Development, and Acquisition (RDA); Advanced Concepts and Requirements (ACR); and Training, Exercises, and Military Operations (TEMO).

 

               (a)  The RDA domain represents the acquisition community.  This domain covers diverse areas such as technology development and evaluation, system development, test and evaluation, and force modernization.  The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology is the RDA domain agent.

 

               (b)  The ACR domain supports the developments community.  Its areas of work include concept evaluations, capabilities development, tactics, and doctrine.  TRADOC FC is the ACR domain agent.

 

               (c)  The TEMO domain has responsibility for M&S that support individual, crew, and unit training, command and battle staff training, mission planning, mission rehearsal, and joint operations.  The CAC is the TEMO domain agent.

 

    c.  Key enabler # 3:  Operational environment.

 

         (1)  Describes the composite of conditions, circumstances, and influences that affect employment of military forces and bear on the decisions of commanders.  Depicts the challenging, adaptive global setting the U.S. military will encounter over the next 20 years, and beyond, and provides the fundamental context for Army and joint experiments and training.  Provides the essential foundation for developing concepts and writing requirements; defines the threat and environment for individual and collective training across schools and CTCs; and provides benchmark for comparing risk, effectiveness, and cost in potential DOTMLPF solutions and for testing materiel solutions to ensure efficiency and effectiveness.

 

         (2)  Consists of wide-ranging and geostrategic analyses encompassing geopolitics, globalization in economics, technology, demographics, infrastructure, and military developments.  Construct incorporates a complex environment spanning traditional, irregular, catastrophic, and disruptive challenges and integrates continual and dynamic change.

 

2-6.  Command and control relationships.  TRADOC has designated lead and assist assignments to specify responsibilities and relationships among senior leaders and organizations.  Designation of lead and assist assignments is the primary means to fix responsibility at all levels of the organization and across the full range of functions and tasks.

 

    a.  Lead:  The TRADOC organization or staff element having primary responsibility for a function, task, or role a higher headquarters assigns.  Responsibility for the function, task, or role begins with initial assignment and ends with its completion.  The responsibility also includes all aspects of planning, execution, and integration across all applicable DOTMLPF domains.  The organization which receives assistance from another organization(s) or staff element(s), and is responsible for ensuring that the supporting organization(s) or staff element(s) understands the assistance required.  Specifically, lead has three areas of responsibility:

 

·        Develop, coordinate, and recommend command policy.

·        Develop, coordinate, and recommend command guidance.

·        Develop, coordinate, and recommend taskings to execute specific missions and tasks or provide specific support.

 

    b.  Lead assignments:  Table 2-1 summarizes the lead assignments for TRADOC's 11 core functions and 3 key enablers.

 

Table 2-1

Core function and key enabler lead designations

Core Function

Lead

Recruit

USAAC

Initial Military Training

USAAC

Functional Training

CAC

Leader Development and Education

CAC

Lessons Learned

CAC

Collective Training

CAC

Doctrine

CAC

Training Support

CAC

Concepts

TRADOC FC

Experimentation

TRADOC FC

Requirements Determination

TRADOC FC

 

 

Key Enabler

Lead

Operational Architecture

TRADOC FC

Modeling and Simulations

TRADOC FC

Operational Environment

DCSINT

 

    c.  Assist:  TRADOC organizations or staff elements a higher headquarters directs to provide augmentation or other support to a lead for a function, task, or role.  The augmentation or other support includes, but is not limited to, all applicable DOTMLPF domains.  The organization that aids, complements, or sustains another organization, and is responsible for providing the assistance the lead organization requires.

 

    d.  Staff management:  The HQ TRADOC staff will provide staff management, facilitate external coordination, and assist the DCG/CofS in the prioritization of resources to assist lead organizations.

 

         (1)  The HQ TRADOC staff will ensure the coordination of DOTMLPF initiatives and functions between TRADOC organizations and external commands and organizations (DoD, HQDA, U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM), other Services, other external agencies and organizations).  Additionally, the staff will assist TRADOC subordinate organizations in the execution of command initiatives which support TRADOC's 11 core functions and 3 key enablers.

 

         (2)  Staff management responsibilities are a broader set of tasks and functions that complement the lead, assist, and major responsibilities this regulation assigns to each organization.  Because of the HQ TRADOC staff's unique position, it is the only organizational entity capable of looking across the MSCs, centers, schools, and other HQ elements to ensure effective integration and synchronization of TRADOC's efforts.

 

         (3)  After a lead organization gets approval for command policy or guidance, the HQ TRADOC staff becomes responsible for promulgating that policy or guidance across TRADOC and to appropriate external organizations and agencies as part of their staff management role.  Additionally, the HQ TRADOC staff is responsible for monitoring compliance in those tasks, processes, or functions where they have assist or major responsibilities and subject matter expertise to determine if execution of the approved policy or guidance meets CG, TRADOC intent and priorities.

 

    e.  Army proponent system:  A system of policy, responsibilities, and relationships, and the procedures necessary to execute the continuous Army force modernization effort.  Only the HQDA Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 can designate proponents.  TRADOC will execute its proponent responsibilities as directed, and will not assign proponents beyond those AR 5-22 designates.

 

         (1)  The three categories of Army proponents that apply to TRADOC are:

 

               (a)  Branch proponent:  The branch proponent is the commandant or director of the respective school or institution that develops concepts, doctrine, TTP, organization designs, materiel requirements, training programs, training support requirements, manpower requirements (except as provided in AR 600-3), education requirements, and related matters for a branch in the Army.

 

               (b)  Specified proponent:  The specified proponent is the commander or chief of any agency responsible for a designated area that does not fall within the purview of a branch proponent.  Specified proponents will have the same responsibilities as branch proponents.

 

               (c)  Functional proponent:  The functional proponent is the commander or chief of an organization or staff element that is the operative agency charged with the accomplishment of a particular function(s).

 

         (2)  A summary of the branch, specified, and functional proponent designations for TRADOC from AR 5-22 follows:

 

               (a)  Branch proponents:

 

·        Commandant, Adjutant General School

·        Commandant, Air Defense Artillery School

·        Commandant, Armor School

·        Commandant, Aviation School/Commandant, Aviation Logistics School

·        Commandant, Chaplain School

·        Commandant, Chemical School

·        Commandant, Engineer School

·        Commandant, Field Artillery School

·        Commandant, Finance School

·        Commandant, Infantry School

·        Commandant, Intelligence School

·        Commandant, Military Police School

·        Commandant, Ordnance Schools

·        Commandant, Quartermaster Center and School

·        Commandant, Signal School

·        Commandant, Transportation School

 

               (b)  Specified proponents:

 

·        CG, CAC:  Operation and design of all organizations, division and above, brigade combat teams, and support brigades; command and control; Army airspace command and control; training simulations; information operations; and electronic warfare.

 

·        CG, CASCOM:  Division support commands, support battalions, support groups, materiel management centers, theater sustainment commands, theater sustainment brigades, logistics headquarters organizational design, host nation support, and integrated logistic support analysis.

 

 

·        Commandant, Signal School:  Network mission area.

 

               (c)  Functional proponent.  The CG, TRADOC:  Commands the principal Army school system, training centers, ROTC, and national defense cadet corps programs; and is the principal Army combat developer.

 

         (3)  TRADOC works with non-TRADOC proponents on DOTMLPF issues including requirements determination.  TRADOC primarily interacts with the following non-TRADOC proponents:

 

·        CG, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School

·        Commandant, The Judge Advocate General's (TJAG) Legal Center and School

·        CG, U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School

·        CG, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command

·        CG, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC)

·        Army Chief of Public Affairs, Army Public Affairs Center.

 

         (4)  The pace and scope of Army transformation puts a premium on adopting a family-of-systems or system-of-systems approach to integrate Army capabilities development and training.  This imperative for integration requires that TRADOC's lead and assist framework subsume many responsibilities otherwise described as proponency.

 

    f.  Special relationships.

 

         (1)  TRADOC Program Integration Office (TPIO):  The CG, TRADOC establishes a TPIO to serve as the user representative for a system-of-systems or family-of-systems or mission area.  TPIOs intensively manage and integrate DOTMLPF requirements and the migration of components into a fully integrated system across affected branch centers and schools, system managers, and project offices.  The TPIOs are required when HQ TRADOC resources must supplement the management resources normally available to a MSC, center, school, or HQ TRADOC staff.  This commitment of resources will provide the commander the ability to intensively manage the interoperability and commonality aspects of the specified system-of-systems, family-of-systems, or mission area.  The TPIOs receive direction from the MSC or HQ TRADOC staff principal to which they are assigned.

 

         (2)  TRADOC System Manager (TSM):  The CG, TRADOC establishes a TSM office to serve as the TRADOC user representative and single POC for systems assigned in accordance with (IAW) the TSM charter.  The TSMs provide intensive management of capability developments when the requirement is beyond the scope of the normal management resources available to subordinate commanders.  Only CG, TRADOC has the authority to modify the TSM scope of responsibilities beyond those specified in TR 71-12.  The TSMs receive guidance from the TRADOC FC and also receive direction from the center or school to which they are assigned.

 

         (3) TRADOC Project Office (TPO):  TPO is an organization that provides intensive management for system(s) for which a TSM is inappropriate.  The TPO acts for the proponent in discharging responsibilities in developing, testing, and integrating total system requirements in the same way that a TSM acts for the CG, TRADOC.  Proponents may establish TPOs when a major or high-interest system is identified by the proponent as needing a more intensive level of management than that provided within the structure of his/her organization, but establishment of a TSM is not warranted.  Proponents may also establish a TPO when a TSM is terminated (disestablished), but the proponent still desires a more intensive level of management than normally provided within the structure of his/her organization.  Organizations establish TPOs for a finite tenure using their own resources.

 

         (4)  Battle labs.

 

               (a)  The CG, TRADOC establishes battle labs to synchronize, coordinate, and accelerate the development process in determining and validating operational and concept requirements and conducting warfighting experiments, studies, and analysis to develop and refine capabilities required for the current and future force.

 

               (b)  Battle labs facilitate the ability of users, developers, and industry to work together to exploit technological advancements and synchronize advanced warfighting concepts.  Battle labs also support the integration of concepts and requirements.  Battle labs help synchronize proposed solutions, throughout all future force elements, to achieve total joint interoperability and interconnectivity.  Guidelines for TRADOC battle labs are:

 

·        The center or school commander commands each battle lab where it is assigned.

·        The work priority for battle labs is as follows:

o       First priority:  HQ TRADOC directs battle lab work through the Army Concept Development and Experimentation Plan (ACDEP).  In the ACDEP, TRADOC FC defines and prioritizes the work and recommends resourcing.

o       Second priority:  The commander of the battle lab employs any work load capacity that is in excess of ACDEP requirements.

o       Third priority: The battle lab deputy director seeks and accepts additional work after meeting all the requirements of the first two priorities.

·        Battle labs must coordinate and integrate their work with affected MSCs or HQ staff organizations to support the family-of-systems and system-of-systems approaches to developments.

 

               (c)  The Unit of Action Maneuver Battle Lab is the only enhanced battle lab.  The enhanced battle lab is different from other battle labs in that it is capable of developing concepts, conducting experiments, and determining DOTMLPF capability requirements for the future force in order to achieve fully integrated capabilities.  The other battle labs do not normally develop concepts but can assist in their development.

 

2-7.  Senior leader roles.  TRADOC senior leaders fulfill their responsibilities through one of four assigned roles (see para 2-6e, above, for a discussion of the proponent role).  The other three senior leader roles are:  commander, commandant, and senior mission commander.  Some senior leaders can be assigned multiple roles, depending on their specific duties.

 

    a.  In the commander role, the senior leader is responsible for Uniformed Code of Military Justice and administration of assigned units and organizations which could consist of centers, schools, and/or staff entities.

 

    b.  In the commandant role, the senior leader is the commander responsible for all aspects of training, education, and mission accomplishment at an individual school or institution.  The commandant's role includes proponent responsibilities that AR 5-22 assigns.

 

    c.  In the senior mission commander role, the senior leader is the ranking commander at a specific installation with responsibilities associated with the installation and tenant units.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 3

Headquarters TRADOC

 

Section I

Organization of HQ TRADOC

 

3-1.  Command group.

 

    a.  The command group consists of:

  • Commanding General
  • Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff
  • Commander's Planning Group (CPG)
  • Command Sergeant Major (CSM)
  • Secretary of the General Staff (SGS)
  • Congressional Activities Office (CAO)
  • Strategic Communications Office
  • U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)/TRADOC Liaison Office

 

    b.  The five other Deputy Commanding Generals are:

  • Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms (DCG, CA)
  • Deputy Commanding General, Futures (DCG, F)
  • Deputy Commanding General, Initial Military Training (DCG, IMT)
  • Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve (DCG, USAR)
  • Deputy Commanding General, Army National Guard (DCG, ARNG)

 

3-2.  Personal staff.  The personal staff consists of:

  • Chief of Public Affairs (CPA)
  • Command Chaplain
  • Inspector General (IG)
  • The Staff Judge Advocate (SJA)

 

 

3-3.  Coordinating staff.  The coordinating staff consists of:

  • DCS for Intelligence (DCSINT)
  • DCS for Operations and Training
  • DCS for Personnel, Infrastructure and Logistics (DCSPIL)
  • DCS for Resource Management
  • Chief Information Officer
  • TRADOC Futures Center

 

3-4.  Special staff.  The special staff consists of:

  • Command Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Officer
  • Command Historian
  • Command Safety Officer (CSO)
  • Command Surgeon
  •  Internal Review and Audit Compliance (IRAC) Officer

 

3-5.  Field Operating Activities.  The FOAs that directly support HQ TRADOC are:

  • TRADOC Futures Center
  • Army Training Support Center (ATSC)
  • Training Operations Management Activity (TOMA)
  • Security Assistance and Training Field Activity (SATFA)
  • Regional Coordinating Element

 

Section II

Headquarters TRADOC Command Group

 

3-6.  Commanding General.  The CG, TRADOC is responsible for ensuring that TRADOC recruits, trains, and educates the Army's Soldiers; develops leaders; supports training in units; develops doctrine; establishes standards; and builds the future Army.

 

3-7.  Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff.  The DCG/CofS is the deputy to the CG, TRADOC and is second in command within TRADOC.  The DCG/CofS acts for the CG within delegated authority and command guidance concerning operations and activities throughout TRADOC.

 

3-8.  Commander's Planning Group.  The CPG provides support as the CG, TRADOC requests; prepares CG's speeches, briefings, presentations, and articles; coordinates CG's participation in 4-star level conferences; reviews and analyzes designated key staff actions; exercises quality control over CG trip books, prepares designated personal correspondence; and assists in the development of the CG's long-range calendar.

3-9.  Command Sergeant MajorThe CSM provides advice and recommendations on individual Soldier training, Soldier morale and welfare matters, and NCO development to CG, TRADOC and the staff.

 

3-10.  Strategic Communications.  The TRADOC Strategic Communications office synchronizes the efforts of numerous supporting agencies to proactively develop communication strategies designed to gain support and understanding of TRADOC and the Army's relevance and direction.

 

3-11.  Secretary of the General Staff.

 

    a.  Mission.  The SGS is the key advisor to the command group for administration and coordinates command group operations.  The SGS manages and coordinates administrative, logistics, and protocol activities for CG, TRADOC and the DCG/CofS; informs DCSOPS&T of all command group taskings; and provides expert technical support and analytic advice on information management (IM) to the command group and special staff offices.

 

    b.  Organization.  The office of the SGS consists of four divisions:  Staff Actions; Executive Services; Administrative; and Information Systems.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The SGS has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Tasks, coordinates, and tracks all administrative staff actions generated by the CG, TRADOC and the DCG/CofS.

 

               (b)  Lead for the TRADOC Staff Officer Orientation Program.

 

               (c)  Lead for TRADOC Memorandum 1-3 and 1-11.

 

               (d)  Plans, coordinates, and supervises protocol support to the CG, USAAC and the Director, TRADOC FC.

 

               (e)  Provides administrative, logistical, and information technology (IT) support to CG and DCG/CofS-directed on- and off-site events and conferences.

 

               (f)  Manages the command group budget that includes civilian pay, travel, contingency funds, IT, and supply accounts.

 

               (g)  Exercises quality control over readaheads for the CG and DCG/CofS.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  None.

 

 

 

 

3-12.  Chief, Congressional Activities Office.

 

    a.  Mission.  The Chief of the CAO advises the command group, HQ staff, and commandants on congressional activities of interest to or directly involving TRADOC, and, in general, the Army.  Stays abreast of TRADOC's major programs to facilitate senior leader interface with Congress as part of the senior Army leadership's effort to communicate the Army story and ensures TRADOC has access to key congressional documents to include reports, bills, key hearing transcripts, and biographical information.

 

    b.  Organization.  The CAO consists of a single office.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The CAO has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Coordinates and executes all congressional visits to HQ TRADOC as well as CG and DCG/CofS TRADOC visits to Capitol Hill to include planning, execution, and resolution of outstanding issues.

 

               (b)  Develops congressional engagement plans for senior leaders.

 

               (c)  Develops and implements commandwide policies and procedures with respect to TRADOC's congressional activities and responsibilities.

 

               (d)  Serves as TRADOC's point of contact for communicating with HQDA Office, Chief of Legislative Liaison and the Congressional Budget Liaison Office concerning legislative matters.

 

               (e)  Assesses impacts and initiatives ongoing in Congress.  Keeps CG and DCG/CofS informed.

 

               (f)  Disseminates key congressional documents.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The CAO has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Coordinates congressional participation during TRADOC-sponsored events, experiments, or exercises.

 

               (b)  Coordinates congressional inquiries and inserts for the record assigned to the HQ staff for response.

 

               (c)  Provides information on committee members and guidance on delivering hearing testimony to lead organization during congressional testimony preparation.

 

               (d)  Provides guidance to HQ and subordinate element staffs concerning contacts with Congress to include visits, events on Capitol Hill, and written correspondence.

 

3-13.  FORSCOM/TRADOC Liaison Office.

 

    a.  Mission.  The Chief of the FORSCOM/TRADOC Liaison Office represents HQ TRADOC for administrative actions or request for information from the staffs of HQDA and other government officials located in the Military District of Washington (MDW).

 

    b.  Organization.  The FORSCOM/TRADOC Liaison Office consists of a single office located at the Pentagon.  The office includes the liaison officer, FORSCOM section, and TRADOC section.

 

    c.  Functions.

 

         (1)  As necessary, initiates coordination and facilitates negotiations with appropriate civil and military authorities in DoD, the Joint Staff, and HQDA on requirements supporting TRADOC activities.

 

         (2)  Supports TRADOC elements, as required, in the coordination with HQDA staff on matters related to TRADOC Soldiers, civilians, and family members.

 

         (3)  Coordinates common issues, actions, and initiatives with the other liaison offices, HQDA, other MACOMs, and other Services to ensure taskings and support requirements, that affect TRADOC, receive proper disposition.

 

         (4)  Supports visiting TRADOC general officers and Senior Executive Service personnel during their travels to MDW including assistance with transportation, parking, billeting, flights, access, security processing, classified storage, office and meeting space, congressional testimony, and computer and telecommunications access.

 

Section III

Other DCGs

 

3-14.  General responsibilities.  Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms; DCG, Futures; and, DCG, Initial Military Training are three other TRADOC DCGs.  In these DCG roles, the senior leaders are responsible for a major functional area and are routinely tasked to represent TRADOC in external meetings, boards, forums, or events based on specific subject matter expertise.  These DCG roles are oriented outside the MACOM.  Senior leaders, with these DCG roles, will revert to their commanding general or director roles and responsibilities for actions internal to TRADOC.  Chapters 4, 5, and 6 discuss the mission, organization, and lead and assist responsibilities for the TRADOC FC, USAAC, and CAC, respectively.  The two other DCGs, DCG, USAR and DCG, ARNG, are senior leaders responsible for advising and assisting CG, TRADOC in all matters related to Reserve Component (RC) issues.

 

3-15.  Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms responsibilities.

 

    a.  Represents CG, TRADOC in matters relating to leader development and education; collective training; training support; functional training; doctrine, and lessons learned.

 

    b.  The DCG, CA represents CG, TRADOC in the following capacities:

 

         (1)  Serves as the TRADOC representative on the Training and Leader Development  General Officer Steering Committee (TLGOSC).

 

         (2)  Serves as the DA responsible official for the CTC Program.

 

         (3)  Serves as principal TRADOC representative on the Battle Command General Officer Steering Committee (GOSC).

 

3-16.  Deputy Commanding General, Futures responsibilities.

 

    a.  Represents CG, TRADOC in the exercise of TRADOC responsibilities to design, develop, and integrate all aspects of the force into the joint force, from concept to capability development.

 

    b.  The DCG, F represents CG, TRADOC in the following capacities:

 

         (1)  Serves as the TRADOC representative on the Army Requirements Oversight Council, the Army Systems Acquisition Review Committee, the Army Marine Corps Board, and the Army Requirements and Resources Board.

 

         (2)  Represents TRADOC on the Army's Study Program Coordination Committee and the RAND Arroyo Center Policy Committee.

 

         (3)  Serves as the senior TRADOC representative on the Army Model and Simulation Executive Council.

 

         (4)  Co-chairs the Space and Missile Defense Senior Advisory Group with CG, SMDC.

 

         (5)  Serves as the senior architecture officer for operational architectures in coordination with (ICW) the Joint Staff, JFCOM, other Services, and HQDA.

 

         (6)  Provides the TRADOC position on the validation of the Army science and technology (S&T) investment portfolio.

         (7)  Serves as a TRADOC representative for Battle Command GOSC.

 

    c.  Develops, recommends approval, and manages the ACDEP.

 

    d.  Manages future force concept development, including Future Combat Systems.

 

    e.  Assists TRADOC DCG/CofS in the development, coordination, and implementation of the future force aspects of the TRADOC Strategic Communications Plan.

 

    f.  Manages TRADOC international activities to synchronize the exchange of DOTMLPF information with allies and friends.

 

3-17.  Deputy Commanding General, Initial Military Training responsibilities.

 

    a.  Represents CG, TRADOC in matters relating to the Army's officer, warrant officer, and enlisted accession process from first contact through completion of IMT.

 

    b.  The DCG, IMT represents CG, TRADOC in the following capacities:

 

         (1)  Develops, prepares, and executes the Army's outreach efforts.

 

         (2)  Serves as the TRADOC representative to the annual Tri-Service ROTC conference.

 

3-18.  Deputy Commanding General, Army National Guard.

 

    a.  Mission.  The DCG, ARNG integrates ARNG capabilities across DOTMLPF domains into TRADOC programs and initiatives and the Army's mission areas.  Assists TRADOC in assuring unity of effort between HQDA and the National Guard Bureau (NGB).

 

    b.  Organization.  The office of the DCG, ARNG consists of an executive office.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCG, ARNG has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Provides CG, TRADOC with ARNG-specific staff recommendations, information, or updates as they directly relate to TRADOC initiatives and functions.

 

               (b)  Provides advice and assistance on policies and leadership decisions affecting the ARNG.

 

               (c)  Coordinates TRADOC actions that involve the ARNG.

               (d)  Liaison to NGB for manning, training, or force structure related actions or initiatives.

 

               (e)  Manages the ARNG Title 10 Active Guard Reserve (AGR) Program in TRADOC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The DCG, ARNG has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  Recruit.  Coordinates strategic plans and information for the ARNG Strength Maintenance Program.

 

               (b)  IMT.  Supports each school and center providing IMT with manpower support for liaison functions.

 

               (c)  Leader development and education.  Provides staff support to CAC and DCSOPS&T for training development and program of instruction (POI) staffing with HQ TRADOC and at centers and schools.

 

               (d)  Doctrine.  Provides staff support to CAC for the integration of ARNG force programs, training strategies, and force-design initiatives.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

 

3-19.  Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve.

 

    a.  Mission.  The DCG, USAR assists CG, TRADOC in executing specific missions that require integration of Reserve Soldiers; coordinates with TRADOC command and staff elements to ensure Army Reserve integration across the full DOTMLPF spectrum; and coordinates directly with the Chief, Army Reserve, the DCG, U. S. Army Reserve Command (USARC), the 84th Army Reserve Readiness Training Command, and commanders of the institutional training divisions on issues that impact USAR institutional mobilization readiness.

 

    b.  Organization.  The office of the DCG, USAR consists of an executive office.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCG, USAR has the following lead responsibilities:

 

          (1)  Core functions:  None:

 

          (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Provides CG, TRADOC with USAR-specific staff recommendations, information, or updates as they directly relate to TRADOC initiatives and functions.

 

               (b)  Provides advice and assistance on policies and leadership decisions affecting the USAR.

 

               (c)  Coordinates TRADOC actions that involve Office of the Chief of the Army Reserve, USARC, and Human Resources Command for USAR issues.

 

               (d)  Ensures Army Reserve capabilities are integrated into Army and joint transformation.

 

               (e)  Manages all AGR, USAR, and Title 10 manning issues throughout TRADOC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The DCG, USAR has the following assist responsibilities:

 

          (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  IMT.  Provides staff support to USAAC as TRADOC lead and to DCSOPS&T for data collection and analysis.

 

               (b)  Functional training.  Provides staff support to CAC as TRADOC lead and to DCSOPS&T for data collection and analysis.

 

               (c)  Leader development and education.  Provides staff support to CAC and DCSOPS&T for training development and POI staffing with HQ TRADOC, the 84th Army Reserve Readiness Training Command, and the centers and schools.

 

               (d)  Experimentation.  Provides staff support to TRADOC FC in examining RC participation in Army and joint experimentation and spiraling capabilities into the RC.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Monitors the utilization and training of the reserve institutional training divisions within TRADOC.

 

               (b)  Participates in development and refinement of The Army School System (TASS) related training strategies.

 

Section IV

Headquarters TRADOC Personal Staff

 

3-20.  Chief of Public Affairs.

 

    a.  Mission.  The CPA serves as the principal adviser to the CG, TRADOC on strategic, operational, and tactical public affairs strategies, plans, and operations.  The CPA initiates, plans, and executes media and community engagements in support of CG, TRADOC guidance and coordinates public affairs and community outreach activities with HQ TRADOC staff, USAAC, HQDA, DoD, joint organizations, other Services, and other external agencies and organizations.

 

    b.  Organization.  The CPA consists of a single office with support staff.  The office has four sections:  Plans, Policy, and Management; Public Communications; Command Information; and Administration.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The CPA has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Serves as command's official spokesperson and liaison with the news media.

 

               (b)  Develops TRADOC public affairs policy, plans, guidance, and products in support of Army programs and initiatives.

 

               (c)  Serves as content manager for the TRADOC website.

 

               (d)  Manages the Public Affairs and Communications Media Civilian Career Program (CP).

 

               (e)  Provides operational control of the U.S. Continental Army Band.

 

               (f)  Provides staff management of public affairs activities at TRADOC centers and schools.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The CPA has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  Serves as command program manager for Army public affairs funds allocated to TRADOC.

 

3-21.  Command Chaplain.

 

    a.  Mission.  The Command Chaplain provides comprehensive religious and staff support to HQ TRADOC, HQ USAAC, and chaplain offices in the subordinate TRADOC organizations.  Trains, resources, and equips the TRADOC unit ministry teams (UMT).

 

    b.  Organization.  The Command Chaplain consists of a single office with support staff.  The Command Chaplain is organized under the DCSPIL for support purposes.

 

    c.   Lead responsibilities.  The Command Chaplain has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Establishes goals, objectives, standards, and priorities for all aspects of chaplain and chaplain assistant personnel management.  Provides chaplains and chaplain assistants with direct technical supervision and reviews and manages their force structureEstablishes, maintains, and executes chaplaincy mobilization and contingency plans across TRADOC.

 

               (b)  Manages seven major functional areas related to providing religious support:  Chaplain Personnel Management, Chaplain Force Structure Management, Chaplain Resource Management, Chaplaincy Training, Chaplain Mobilization, Chaplaincy Operations and Tasking, and Chaplain Assistants Integration.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The Command Chaplain has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Serves as liaison between the Army and TRADOC subordinate commands for chaplain personnel assignments.

 

               (b)  Participates in and promotes the Chief of Chaplains' Recruitment Program.

 

               (c)  Implements a total religious program at all levels of TRADOC that advises UMTs and commanders on religious requirements and practices.

 

               (d)  Assists in implementation of the Army's Well-Being Program throughout TRADOC.

 

               (e)  Monitors and evaluates professional development and sustainment training of chaplains and chaplain assistants within TRADOC.

 

               (f)  Plans and executes the Army Suicide Prevention Campaign Plan by training TRADOC chaplains and chaplain assistants in suicide prevention.

 

3-22.  Inspector General.

 

    a.  Mission.  The IG assesses and reports on the state of efficiency, economy, discipline, morale, training, and readiness within TRADOC.

 

    b.  Organization.  The IG consists of a single office with support staff.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The IG has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Collects, analyzes, and maintains assistance, inquiries, and investigation case data and inspection results.

 

               (b)  Teaches and trains, as needed, on Army systems, processes, and procedures to include Army inspections.

 

               (c)  Performs follow-up inspections as needed.

 

               (d)  Advises CG, TRADOC and HQ TRADOC staff on command issues and inspection policies.

 

               (e)  Advises CG, TRADOC on the effectiveness of the Organizational Inspection Program.

 

               (f)  Coordinates required IG actions with other appropriate MACOMs, Department of the Army Inspector General (DAIG) and DoD IG.

 

               (g)  Coordinates inspection results with TRADOC staff and other appropriate commands or agencies.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The IG has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Provides functional IG staff management to subordinate installation and organization IG offices and to HQ USAAC.

 

               (b)  Augments DAIG and DoD IG technical inspection teams within TRADOC.

 

3-23.  Staff Judge Advocate.

 

    a.  Mission.  The SJA provides full spectrum of legal services to HQ TRADOC activities, tenants, and garrison.

 

    b.  Organization.  The SJA accomplishes its mission through one consolidated legal office with different divisions and offices located on the installation.  The consolidated SJA office consists of the SJA, HQ TRADOC; and the Post Judge Advocate (PJA), U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Monroe.  The office of the SJA consists of four sections:  Executive Branch, Administrative Law Branch, Military Law Branch, and the Civil Law Branch.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The SJA has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Provides personal legal advice to the CG, TRADOC, command group, HQ Staff, and subordinate commanders and staff; provides general legal support to Northeast Region, Installation Management Agency and U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Monroe; provides general legal advice and staff management to TRADOC centers, schools, activities, and organizations; and provides legal advice and support to CG, USAAC for IMT policy.

 

               (b)  Supports the Office of TJAG in implementing TJAG's policy guidance within TRADOC.

 

               (c)  Conducts staff assistance visits to monitor legal support to TRADOC centers, schools, activities, and organizations.

 

               (d)  Supports delivery of legal services within the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Monroe, to include legal assistance, tax assistance, claims, and justice.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The SJA has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  Serves on the staff assistance team monitoring compliance with statutes and regulations and execution of IMT policy.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

 

Section V

Headquarters TRADOC Coordinating Staff

 

3-24.  Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence.

 

    a.  Mission.  The TRADOC DCSINT studies, designs, coordinates, and applies current and future Operational Environment (OE) in support of joint and Army programs for training and leader development, concept development, experimentation, and requirements determination.  Provides independent expert, critical reviews of plans, concepts, organizations, and programs.  Serves as the joint lead and Army proponent for red teaming.  Serves as the Army lead for joint open source intelligence.  Recommends and exercises staff management of all intelligence, foreign disclosure, and security (personnel, technology, and communications) policy, products, and priorities.  Represents TRADOC in coordinating for intelligence resources and integration of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) concepts and requirements with responsible agencies.

 

    b.  Organization.  The DCSINT consists of 10 directorates.  Six directorates are located at Fort Monroe and four are located at Fort Leavenworth.  The directorates located at Fort Monroe are:  ISR Integration; Intelligence; Contemporary Operating Environment (COE)/Opposing Force (OPFOR) Application; Force/Mission Protection; Weather Office; and Devil's Advocate.  Directorates located at Fort Leavenworth are:  Wargaming and Experimentation, University of Foreign Military and Cultural Studies (UFMCS), Threat and OE Application, and Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO).

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCSINT has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Key Enablers.  OE:  Studies, develops and maintains the OE; manages OE replication and design for Army and joint/Army cosponsored training, wargames, and experiments; manages the Army OE/OPFOR Program to support CTC training and modernization; and develops the joint OE ICW JFCOM J2.

 

               (a)  Provides validated OEs and threats to support leader development and education programs for JFCOM, other Services, and the Joint Forces Staff College and collective training programs for JFCOM and the other Services.

 

               (b)  Ensures insights on OE and threats are integrated into aspects of the joint lessons learned process in support of JFCOM.

 

         (3)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Serves as the TRADOC Senior Intelligence Officer (SIO).

 

               (b)  Performs staff management for all aspects of ISR integration efforts within TRADOC.

 

               (c)  Leads TRADOC foreign studies effort to include the culture, OE, and military dimensions.

 

               (d)  Develops the concept for UFMCS; establishes and operates the program to provide the associated education, lessons learned, and operational reachback across the Army and joint community.

 

               (e)  Manages the Defense Civilian Intelligence Personnel System CP 35 for TRADOC.

 

               (f)  Leads the Devil's Advocate program and efforts in TRADOC.

 

               (g)  Leads command security management program for TRADOC including programming, developing and implementing policy, and management of security execution.  Provides TRADOC command security manager.

 

               (h)  Provides guidance for protecting the Army's future warfighting technologies through the Army Research and Technology Protection Center-TRADOC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The DCSINT has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  Recruit.  Assists USAAC by providing force protection support and staff management for personnel security clearances to allow for uninterrupted Soldier training.

 

               (b)  Initial Military Training.  Assists USAAC by designing, validating and replicating OEs and threats that serve as training conditions for all IMT programs.

 

               (c)  Functional Training.  Assists CAC by designing, validating, and replicating OEs and threats that serve as training conditions for all applicable functional training programs.

 

               (d)  Leader development and education.  Assists CAC by designing, validating, and replicating OEs and threats that serve as training conditions for all leader development and education programs.  Establishes a UFMCS that will produce leaders who can continuously challenge ideas, concepts, capabilities, plans, and operations in the context of the OE.

 

               (e)  Collective training.  Assists CAC by designing, validating, and replicating OEs and threats that serve as training conditions for all collective training programs.  Also, works with CAC on all OE and Joint OE initiatives for the CTCs.  Uses FMSO, Joint Reserve Intelligence Center, and open source intelligence to directly support this core function.

 

               (f)  Lessons Learned.  Assists CAC by ensuring insights on OE and threats are integrated into all aspects of the lessons learned process in support of the Army.  Applies adversarial and red teaming perspectives and methodologies to lessons learned to update and validate the OE in support of the Army and joint community.

 

               (g)  Doctrine.  Applies the OE in all capstone doctrine and produces the Field Manual (FM) 7-100 series of Army manuals and other COE and OPFOR doctrinal products.  The UFMCS produces "red teaming" doctrine.

 

               (h)  Concepts.  Applies the OE in all aspect of concept development.  Develops functional concepts as required in support of the TRADOC FC, JFCOM, and HQDA DCS, G-2.  Coordinates all ISR concepts with JFCOM, joint and national agencies, and other Services.  Provides independent and relevant critical reviews (Devil's Advocate) across this core function.

 

               (i)  Experimentation.  Applies the OE in experimental scenarios that provides the consistent benchmark to measure risk, cost, and effectiveness.  Provides scenario context and validates and provides certified personnel to replicate the environment and threat capabilities.  Assists in gaining selected allied and coalition partners access to experimental programs.  Supports ACDEP development.

 

               (j)  Requirements determination.  Produces the key environment and threat documentation the JCIDS requires.  Facilitates the intelligence certification required to support this core function.  Participates in test and evaluation master plan development and produces threat test support plans.

 

               (k)  Modeling and simulations.  Assists TRADOC FC by providing input on M&S capability and resource requirements.  Reviews M&S programs for adequacy in replicating the OE.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks.  Provides staff management for personnel security clearances in support of all TRADOC training programs, schools, and courses.

 

3-25.  Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Training.

 

    a.  Mission.  The DCSOPS&T functions as the TRADOC G-3 in the areas of training, operations, readiness, plans, and personnel proponency.  Essential functions:

 

           (1)  Training.  The DCSOPS&T articulates the CG, TRADOC's training vision and guidance; provides staff management for TRADOC's Soldier and leader training and education; manages training support for CG, CAC; recommends training and resource strategies, priorities, and policy to the CG, TRADOC and DCG/CofS; monitors training effectiveness; ensures adaptation of TRADOC training into the future; and leads TRADOC implementation of DOD training transformation initiatives including joint air-ground operations.

 

         (2)  Operations and Readiness.  The DCSOPS&T integrates and synchronizes operations across TRADOC and manages readiness of the training base.  The DCSOPS&T analyzes, integrates, and synchronizes command requirements and resources to ensure commandants can perform their operational and training missions.  At the same time, DCSOPS&T leads TRADOC force protection efforts; serves as primary tasking authority for TRADOC; runs the TRADOC Emergency Operations Center; manages the continental United States Replacement Centers; publishes current plans, directives, and operations orders associated with the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), mobilization, and general war; and monitors and reports readiness to CG, TRADOC.

 

         (3)  Plans.  The DCSOPS&T writes, monitors, and tracks the execution of plans with command operational impact; plans changes to the training base in support of evolving Army requirements; and prepares TRADOC for future changes to training.

 

         (4)  Personnel proponency.  The DCSOPS&T is the TRADOC lead for personnel proponency and coordinates, integrates, and synchronizes personnel life-cycle management for TRADOC and non-TRADOC branch, functional area, and career management field personnel proponents.

 

    b.  Organization.  The DCSOPS&T consists of ten directorates and three FOAs.  The directorates are:  Operations, Mobilization, and Readiness; Joint and Combined Arms Training; Leader Development and Education; Individual Training; Training Development and Delivery; Training Program Analysis and Evaluation; TASS; Training Plans and Capabilities Review; Command Provost Marshal; and Personnel Proponency.  The three FOAs are:  ATSC, TOMA, and SATFA.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCSOPS&T has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Leads TRADOC force protection execution.  The DCSOPS&T serves as the TRADOC Force Protection Officer.

 

               (b)  Leads personnel domain of DOTMLPF for TRADOC.

 

               (c)  Leads the Army Distributed Learning Program.

 

               (d)  Serves as Army program manager for security assistance training provided to international military personnel.

 

               (e)  Leads TRADOC tasking process (see chap 12).

 

               (f)  Manages the TASS.  Plans and coordinates courses conducted in TASS.

 

               (g)  Integrates and synchronizes implementation of training and training functional plans across TRADOC.  Manages the TRADOC Staff and Faculty Training Program, the Classroom XXI Program, joint training issues, TRADOC RC training initiatives, common task identification, and base realignment and closure planning for training issues.

 

               (h)  Leads Chemical Surety Program execution.  The DCSOPS&T serves as the TRADOC Chemical Surety Officer.

 

               (i)  Advises CG, TRADOC and DCG/CofS on operational impact of resourcing decisions.  Synchronizes training resource requirements.

 

               (j)  Leads development and implementation of operational plans for TRADOC including TRADOC plans for implementing Army decisions, directives, and plans, such as Army force generation and Office of Institutional Army Adaptaion.  TRADOC lead to integrate and implement the Army Campaign Plan.

 

               (k)  Manages institutional training base operations including IMT, functional training, and leader development and education.  Manages the Structure Manning Decision Review (SMDR) and Training Requirements Arbitration Panel (TRAP) processes to synchronize training base requirements with school capabilities and capacities.

 

               (l)  Leads TRADOC execution of training transformation intiatives which includes:  TRADOC implementation of the Joint National Training Capability (JNTC) Program, the Joint Knowledge Development and Distribution Capability (JKDDC), and the Joint Assessment and Enabling Capability.  Serves as the Army capability manager of JKDDC.

 

               (m)  Develops guidance, policies, and procedures for the control and management of operational security within HQ TRADOC.

 

               (n)  Leads the Army Interservice Training Program.

 

               (o)  Manages the TRADOC Quality Assurance Program.

 

               (p)  Leads the Army's Civilian CP 32 (Training and Warfighting Development).

 

               (q)  Integrates all joint air ground issues within TRADOC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The DCSOPS&T has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  IMT.  Provides staff management of basic training and advanced individual training policy execution to assist USAAC.

 

               (b)  Functional Training.  Serves as the DCG, CA's staff for functional training.

 

               (c)  Leader Development and Education.  Provides staff management of professional development training policy execution to assist CAC.

 

               (d)  Collective Training.  Provides staff management of collective training strategies and support to institutional training to assist CAC.

 

               (e)  Doctrine.  Assists CAC in the development and coordination of training doctrine.

 

               (f)  Training support.  Serves as the DCG, CA's staff for training support.

 

               (g)  Concepts.  Assists TRADOC FC in the development of concepts by HQ TRADOC.  Ensures training, leadership, and education implications are identified and addressed during concept development ICW CAC.

 

               (h)  Experimentation.  Coordinates training community efforts in S&T, research and studies, and experimentation and provides training input for the ACDEP.

 

               (i)  Requirements determination.  Determines personnel implications and assesses training and leadership and education implications during the JCIDS analysis of Army concepts and concept capability plans (CCPs) and the development of required capabilities in support of TRADOC FC.  Assists in the development of system training plans.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Assists HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7 in the development of the Army training strategy.

 

               (b)  Assists CAC and CASCOM in the development of Army training strategies, such as, digital training, urban operations, and echelons above division combat service support (CSS) training strategies.

 

               (c)  Provides staff management of individual training within the core functions of IMT, leader development and education, and functional training.

 

               (d)  Assists CAC by providing staff management of TLGOSC and TEMO modeling and simulation domain issues.

 

               (e)  Provides staff management of the TRADOC Corrections Program.

 

               (f)  Monitors training and education readiness trends.

 

               (g)  Assists CAC and FC in coordination and integration of combat identification issues.

 

3-26.  Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Infrastructure, and Logistics.

 

    a.  Mission.  The DCSPIL is the senior adviser to CG, TRADOC on military and civilian personnel, logistics, engineering, environmental, and integration of base support programs.  The DCSPIL develops policy, recommends priorities, and manages resources to manage TRADOC mission-specific support functions.

 

    b.  Organization.  The DCSPIL consists of five directorates:  Adjutant General, Logistics, Civilian Personnel, Engineer, and Integration and Support.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCSPIL has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Provides military personnel strength and distribution management and manages military personnel services support programs, to include the TRADOC Equal Opportunity and Military Retention Programs.

 

               (b)  Provides civilian personnel policy and guidance.

 

               (c)  Develops supply and maintenance policy; manages readiness and redistribution of training equipment assets; provides staff management of clothing initial issue points and organizational clothing and individual equipment; provides transportation and travel advice; provides staff management for current and emerging logistics automation systems; and provides ammunition quality assurance and surveillance.

 

               (d)  Defines facilities support requirements; recommends priorities for military construction and maintenance projects; provides design standards and a strategic development plan for trainee barracks; provides National Environmental Policy Act compliance support; and provides TRADOC input to the Base Realignment and Closure process.

 

               (e)  Integrates base operations support that the Installation Management Agency provides to TRADOC; develops input to the Army Family Action Plan; and manages well-being program implementation.

 

               (f)  Provides ADCON to the Command Chaplain, Historian, and Surgeon and provides daily administrative support to the Command Safety and EEO offices.

 

               (g)  Provides personnel and logistics support to USAAC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The DCSPIL has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  Assists the TRADOC FC in determining facilities implications during the JCIDS analysis of Army concepts and the development of required capabilities.  Identifies, plans, and coordinates changes required from these implications for TRADOC centers and schools.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

 

3-27.  Deputy Chief of Staff for Resource Management.

 

    a.  Mission.  The DCSRM formulates, allocates, administers, determines, and validates requirements for, and monitors the utilization of TRADOC resources--funding, manpower, and equipment--to execute TRADOC missions.  The DCSRM also serves as the principal management and financial adviser to CG, TRADOC; assists major subordinate commanders and staff with finance, resource, and management matters; and is responsible for long-range planning, programming, receipt, distribution, and execution of all resources assigned to TRADOC.

 

    b.  Organization.  The DCSRM consists of five directorates and an administrative office.  The directorates are Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation; Budget; Manpower and Force Analysis; Finance and Accounting; and Management.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The DCSRM has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  The DCSRM serves as CG, TRADOC's lead for all resource matters.  The HQ TRADOC resource management forums, in order of authority, are the Board of Directors (BOD), Senior Resource Committee (SRC), and the Mission and Resources Board (MRB).  The BOD is the only decision making body, acting on recommendations from the SRC.  The SRC, in turn, processes recommendations resulting from the MRB review of resource issues.  As the overall resource coordinator for TRADOC, the DCSRM:

 

               (a)  Advises the BOD, serves as a voting member of the SRC, and co-chairs the MRB along with a DCSOPS&T-appointed Director.  Provides the MRB and SRC with resource distribution strawmen based upon historical precedent and current guidance.  Recommends adjustments to the distribution of available resources to TRADOC programs.

 

               (b)  Obtains, interprets, and disseminates DoD and HQDA planning, programming, cost analysis, budgeting, and execution policies to ensure compliance with regulatory and fiduciary responsibilities as defined in the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act.

 

               (c)  Analyzes plans, programs, budgets, cost estimates, manpower documents, and all other resource documentation for conformance with DoD and HQDA guidance and TRADOC mission priorities.  Conducts independent horizontal and vertical analyses of program execution and return on investment.

 

               (d)  Exercises staff management of all TRADOC resources, and implements adequate assurances that resources are programmed and executed IAW established command guidance and priorities.  Issues resource guidance and taskers to TRADOC organizations in support of priorities established by the CG and TRADOC functional advocates.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities:  None.

 

3-28.  Chief Information Officer.

 

    a.  Mission.  The TRADOC Information Officer (CIO) is the senior adviser to CG, TRADOC for all matters relating to IT, IM, and knowledge management (KM) necessary for the execution of TRADOC's mission.  The CIO develops TRADOC-wide IT, IM, and KM plans, policies, procedures, and its enterprise architecture.  The CIO provides staff management for the development, acquisition, integration, operation, and sustainment of IT, IM, and KM applications, systems, and services for TRADOC.

 

    b.  Organization.  The CIO consists of the Office of the CIO, an administrative office and four directorates.  The directorates are Integration, Operations, Architecture, and Information Assurance.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The CIO has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Manages TRADOC's enterprise architecture development, integration (internal and external), and maintenance.

 

               (b)  Executes IM/IT capital planning, investment, and portfolio management.

 

               (c)  Manages governance processes to include developing and enforcing IM/IT strategy, plans, and policy.

 

               (d)  Manages information assurance and information systems security.

 

               (e)  Incorporates knowledge management fundamentals, processes, and systems as the Chief Knowledge Officer.

 

               (f)  Develops and oversees TRADOC's data management strategy.

 

               (g)  Manages the TRADOC administrative publications program.

 

               (h)  Provides the TRADOC Records Manager.

 

               (i)  Provides the TRADOC web master.

 

               (j)  Provides the TRADOC voting member on the Army CIO Executive Board.

 

               (k)  Conducts technology assessments and assists with IT-enabled process improvement.

 

               (l)  Manages selected IM/IT projects that affect TRADOC wide operations.

 

               (m)  Develops partnering relationships with functional proponents on IT-related initiatives to ensure architectural compliance, technical feasibility, and information structure integration.

 

               (n)  Provides the Career Program Manager for all TRADOC civilian employees assigned to the Information Technology Management CP 34 career field.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities:  The CIO has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  Assists major subordinate commanders and staff with technology integration decisions and solution determination.

 

Section VI

Headquarters TRADOC Special Staff

 

3-29.  Command Equal Employment Opportunity Officer.

 

    a.  Mission.  The Command EEO Officer serves as the TRADOC adviser on all EEO matters; recommends EEO policy and guidance; conducts staff management of TRADOC's EEO program; and coordinates and allocates resources.  Customers include, but are not limited to, HQ USAAC, HQ TRADOC elements, and TRADOC senior mission commanders and school commandants.

 

    b.  Organization.  The EEO office consists of a single office.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The EEO Officer has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Develops and provides commandwide policy, staff management, guidance, and coordination for TRADOC's Affirmative Employment Program.

 

               (b)  Monitors all stages of the EEO complaint process for TRADOC EEO complaints.

 

               (c)  Conducts EEO program evaluations.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The EEO Officer has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Ensures compliance across TRADOC with all EEO Commission management directives and federal statutes and ARs with EEO provisions.

 

               (b)  Provides EEO training for HQ TRADOC and HQ USAAC.

 

3-30.  Command Historian.

 

    a.  Mission.  The TRADOC Command Historian provides staff management of TRADOC's military history and museum programs.

 

    b.  Organization.  The Command Historian's office consists of a single office with support staff.  The Command Historian supervises the TRADOC Military History Office which consists of program managers for TRADOC-wide field history, museums, and historical property; research historians, and a support staff.  The TRADOC Military History office is organized under the DCSPIL for support purposes.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The Command Historian has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Develops Army policies and procedures for instruction in military history and for the use of museums and military history simulations in support of recruiting, Soldier training, and professional development.

 

               (b)  Supervises development of Army staff ride doctrine.

 

               (c)  Supervises TRADOC execution of branch-related military history programs.

 

               (d)  Develops policy for and ensures collection and interpretation of artifacts and documents throughout TRADOC.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The Command Historian has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  Lessons learned.  Develops insights into contemporary problems gained from analysis of military and materiel history to assist CAC.

 

               (b)  Doctrine.  Provides historical analysis for doctrine writers' use to assist CAC.

 

               (c)  Concepts.  Provides historical analysis for concept writers' use to assist TRADOC FC.

 

               (d)  Requirements determination and experimentation.  Provides a complete and thorough history of weapons systems, personnel support, materiel, and transportation systems to assist TRADOC FC.

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Assists in development of the Army Historical Plan.

 

               (b)  Assists in planning and programming for the National Museum of the United States Army.

 

               (c)  Assists in executing the DA Museum certification program in TRADOC.

 

               (d)  Conducts DA Military History Program certification in TRADOC.

 

3-31.  Command Safety Officer.

 

    a.  Mission.  The CSO serves as the primary adviser to CG, TRADOC and the CG, USAAC on matters of safety and risk management, coordinating with the Army safety staff (includes the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center and the Army Safety Office), other MACOM safety offices, and federal agencies to ensure compliance with applicable laws, federal codes, and regulations.  Supports TRADOC subordinate commands, centers, schools, and field operating activities in the application of system safety principles and requirements into training, capability development, and operational aspects of their mission areas.

 

    b.  Organization.  The office of the CSO consists of three divisions:  Accessions and Training, Plans and Doctrine, and Future Developments.  The CSO is organized under DCSPIL for support.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The CSO has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Develops TRADOC safety and risk management doctrine and policy.

 

               (b)  Provides safety education, training, and promotion.

 

               (c)  Performs accident reporting, investigation, and records management.

 

               (d)  Conducts safety inspections, surveys, and assessments.

 

               (e)  Conducts hazard analysis and develops countermeasures.

 

               (f)  Executes semi-annual Senior Executive Safety Board.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The CSO has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  Recruit and IMT.  Provides operational safety staff management to mitigate potential risk during the recruiting and IMT processes.

 

               (b)  Leader development and education.  Incorporates safety and risk management into leader development and education courses and training, provides staff management of the integration of risk management into all branch school products, and provides general safety staff management in the officer training and education process.

 

               (c)  Lessons learned.  Develops, publishes, and disseminates, as appropriate, lessons learned based on analysis and findings from safety evaluations and investigations and accident experience trends.

 

               (d)  Collective training.  Assesses and evaluates training programs to ensure integration of safety and risk management into planning, execution, and after action reviews.

 

               (e)  Doctrine.  Develops safety and risk management policy and doctrine.  Provides review and recommendations for doctrine to facilitate effective integration of safety and risk management.

 

               (f)  Training support.  Provides safety review and input for system training plans.

 

               (g)  Concepts.  Manages the TRADOC System Safety Engineering Program and serves as the primary technical advisor integrating safety and risk management as part of concept developments.

 

               (h)  Requirements determination.  Assists TRADOC FC through integration of safety and risk management into DOTMLPF requirements; reviews, assesses, and validates new equipment training requirements; and reviews requirements and JCIDS capability documents.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

 

3-32.  Command Surgeon.

 

    a.  Mission.  The TRADOC Command Surgeon serves as the senior medical staff adviser for TRADOC.  The Surgeon advises the CG, TRADOC and CG, USAAC on the health of their commands.  The Surgeon promotes health in TRADOC and provides staff management over all aspects of healthcare throughout TRADOC and IMT process.  The Surgeon ensures individual and collective medical training are executed in a disciplined combined arms training environment.  The Surgeon ensures medical readiness of IMT graduates.

 

    b.  Organization.  The office of the Command Surgeon consists of five offices:  Executive Office; Operations; Clinical Staff Office; Command Behavorial Health Office; and Administrative Office.  The Command Surgeon is organized under the DCSPIL for support purposes.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The Command Surgeon has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Recommends and monitors IMT, Drill Sergeant School, and NCOES medical training.

 

               (b)  Monitors TRADOC senior mission commanders' mental health and suicide prevention programs.

 

               (c)  Recommends and facilitates training base medical research to:

 

·        Improve the accessions screening process.

·        Reduce preventable injuries and illnesses in the training base.

·        Improve Soldier performance in training and combat.

 

               (d)  Develops and coordinates programs that ensure individual medical readiness for IMT Soldiers.

 

               (e)  Ensures all five Army Training Center reception battalions conduct IET medical  in-processing to standard.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities.  The Command Surgeon has the following assist responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:

 

               (a)  Recruit.  Assists USAAC by coordinating with Military Entrance Processing Command (MEPCOM) for the screening of applicants in order to ensure the quality of Army recruits and decrease attrition in IMT.

 

               (b)  IMT.  Assists USAAC by monitoring training and training support packages for the conduct of practical, realistic individual, collective, and leader medical training for IMT and Drill Sergeant School.

 

               (c)  Functional training and leader development and education.  Assists CAC by monitoring training and training support packages for the conduct of practical, realistic individual, collective, and leader medical training for the NCOES; serves as liaison to the Office of the U.S. Army Surgeon General for health policies and issues; and serves as liaison to U.S. Army Medical Command for medical training.

 

               (d)  Requirements determinationAssists TRADOC FC in developing medical personnel, equipment, and unit requirements ICW U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School to ensure their incorporation throughout the JCIDS process.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  Monitors the medical and administrative milestones for medical evaluation board completion at each installation.

 

3-33.  Internal Review and Audit Compliance.

 

    a.  Mission.  The Chief of the IRAC office supports the TRADOC leadership, HQ USAAC, and the other subordinate TRADOC organizations in improving accountability and compliance in the execution of their missions.  Reviews the execution of management controls to ensure efficient and effective operational business practices.

 

    b.  Organization.  The IRAC office consists of a single office.

 

    c.  Lead responsibilities.  The Chief of IRAC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

         (1)  Core functions:  None.

 

         (2)  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

               (a)  Develops and executes an annual internal review plan.

 

               (b)  Develops, establishes, and implements TRADOC internal review policy and guidance.

 

               (c)  Advises command on program compliance; initiatives that increase efficiencies and effectiveness in executing missions; and eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse.

 

    d.  Assist responsibilities:  None.

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 4

TRADOC Futures Center

 

4-1.  Mission of TRADOC FCThe Director of the TRADOC FC designs, develops, and integrates into a joint operational environment, from concept to capability development, all aspects of the force.  Develops and integrates joint and Army concepts, architectures and DOTMLPF capabilities; validates S&T priorities; and leads experimentation.  The Director of the TRADOC FC also synchronizes and integrates Army capabilities with joint, interagency, and multinational capabilities.

 

4-2.  Organization of TRADOC FCThe TRADOC FC consists of five directorates and a forward operating element (see fig 4-1, below).  The directorates include:  Concept Development and Experimentation; Capabilities Developments; Requirements Integration; Architecture Integration and Management; and, International Army Programs.  The forward operating element is Futures Center (Forward), which is a liaison office located in the National Capital Region.

 

Figure 4-1.  TRADOC Futures Center

 

4-3.  Lead responsibilities of TRADOC FC.  The TRADOC FC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  Concepts.  Leads Army concept development and supports joint concept development through TRADOC and non-TRADOC centers and schools; develops and manages the Army Concept Strategy; directs, manages, and synchronizes concept development by integrated concept teams, integrated capabilities development teams (ICDTs), and TRADOC and non-TRADOC centers and schools; and ensures the integration of land force capabilities in the development of joint operating, functional, and integrating concepts ICW HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7, the Joint Staff J-7, JFCOM, and other combatant commands.

 

         (2)  Experimentation.  Develops, coordinates, prioritizes, and directs execution of experimentation through TRADOC and non-TRADOC centers and schools IAW joint and Army guidance.  Develops the ACDEP and manages its execution.  Synchronizes and integrates Army experimentation with joint experimentation ICW HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7.  Coordinates experimentation and experimentation support across TRADOC with JFCOM; other Services; interagency; multinational; HQDA; U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command; U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command; SMDC; and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.  Plans and coordinates Army participation in joint wargames ICW JFCOM J-9.

 

         (3)  Requirements determination.  Develops, coordinates, and recommends policy, guidance, and provides direction to execute the JCIDS and manages its implementation and execution within TRADOC.  Integrates DOTMLPF developments to support required capabilities.  Coordinates, synchronizes, and integrates Army capabilities developments with other MACOMs, the combatant commands, the Joint Staff, and other Service developments.

 

               (a)  Identifies and refines required capabilities for the future force.

 

               (b)  Manages the JCIDS capabilities based assessment by centers and schools to identify gaps in joint and Army capabilities and proposes materiel or nonmateriel approaches to resolve or mitigate those gaps.

 

               (c)  Manages the development of JCIDS capability documents (ICD, CDD, CPD, and DCR) that propose DOTMLPF solutions to capability gaps.

 

               (d)  Coordinates, staffs, and validates JCIDS capability documents and forwards TRADOC-validated and CG, TRADOC-endorsed JCIDS capability documents to HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7 for Chief of Staff, U.S. Army (CSA) approval.

 

    b.  Key Enablers:

 

         (1)  Operational Architecture.  Supports the CG, TRADOC's role as the Army's operational architect; develops and coordinates policy to develop operational architecture; provides guidance and direction for development, integration, validation, and maintenance of operational architectures in support of approved concepts; forwards validated operational architectures endorsed by CG, TRADOC to HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7 for approval; and, as required, supports centers and schools in the development of operational architecture products.

 

         (2)  Modeling and Simulations.  Directs and focuses M&S efforts to support joint and Army capabilities development; coordinates modeling, simulation, and analytical requirements within the Army, other Services, and joint agencies in support of joint experimentation and analysis; assists centers and schools and analytic agencies in identifying M&S deficiencies, both through the JCIDS capabilities based assessment process and direct feedback from the M&S community; validates M&S requirements; and serves as the ACR domain agent.

 

    c.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Future warfare.  Conducts broad studies of future warfare to isolate those issues vital to development of the Army's future force and frames those issues for the CSA; the CG, TRADOC; and Commander, JFCOM.  Through joint and Army future studies, Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) wargames, Army Title 10 wargames and other venues, examines alternative futures to generate ideas about how the Army can best anticipate changes that will be required to develop the most effective force for the far future (20+ years) timeframe.

 

         (2)  Force design.  Serves as the TRADOC lead for JCIDS-derived organizational solutions and their input into the total Army analysis (TAA) process; develops and provides guidance and formulates plans, policy, priorities, and procedures for execution of TRADOC force design goals and objectives; conducts the force design update process for the Army; and manages TRADOC participation in the TAA process.

 

         (3)  Science and technology.  Informs the Army S&T community of warfighter needs.  Validates Army S&T investments by participation in the Army S&T Process.  Conducts technology reconnaissance to assist spiral developments.

 

          (4)  Spiral development.  Manages the spiral development of capabilities to address high priority, current force capability gaps and to accelerate capabilities from the future force to the current force.  Provides staff management of proponent development and integration of DOTMLPF capabilities for spiral developments.

 

         (5)  Scenario development.  Manages the development, approval, and use of scenarios to support TRADOC experiments, studies, and analysis for capabilities developments.

 

        (6)  Studies and analysis.  Manages the TRADOC Studies and Analysis Program (TSAP).

 

         (7)  International activities.  Manages and coordinates TRADOC international activities to synchronize the exchange of multinational DOTMLPF information with friends and allies to enhance current and future operational capabilities.

 

         (8)  Battle Lab Collaborative Simulation Environment (BLCSE).  Manages the configuration of the TRADOC-wide distributed M&S network, the BLCSE.

 

4-4.  Assist responsibilities of TRADOC FC.  The TRADOC FC has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:  The TRADOC FC assists CAC by developing and maintaining TRADOC policy for doctrine development and writes, reviews, and coordinates TRADOC and/or Army input to joint, allied, multinational, interagency, and multi-Service doctrine.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5

U. S. Army Accessions Command

 

5-1.  Mission of USAACThe CG, USAAC is charged with providing integrated command and control of the recruiting and initial military training for the Army officer, warrant officer, and enlisted forces.  The USAAC transforms volunteers into Soldiers and leaders for the Army.

 

5-2.  Organization of USAAC.  The USAAC consists of a HQ element and four subordinate commands:  U.S. Army Recruiting Command (USAREC), U.S. Army Cadet Command (USACC), the U.S. Army Training Center (USATC) at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and the U.S. Army Accessions Support Brigade (USAASB) located at Fort Knox, Kentucky.  The USAAC operates from three locations:  Fort Monroe, Virginia; Fort Knox, Kentucky; and Fort Jackson, South Carolina (see fig 5-1).

 

 

Figure 5-1.  U.S. Army Accessions Command

 

5-3.  Lead responsibilities of USAAC.  The USAAC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  Recruit.  Executes accession of the officer, warrant officer, and enlisted populations into the RA and the USAR.

 

         (2)  IMT.  Sets standards for and provides training in the basic skills, knowledge, and task proficiencies needed to become a Soldier and subsequently to succeed as a member of an Army unit, contribute to unit mission accomplishment, and survive on the battlefield.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  Serves as executive agent for MEPCOM, and provides management and administrative and resource support.

 

5-4.  Assist responsibilities of USAAC.  The USAAC has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  Functional training.  Assists CAC with the coordination and synchronization of post-IMT functional training and in the identification of capabilities and development of requirements for future functional training needs.

 

         (2)  Leader development and education.  Assists CAC by developing and coordinating precommissioning and cadre training; developing, coordinating, and synchronizing enlisted and officer training, as appropriate; and identifying capabilities and development of requirements for future leader development needs.

 

         (3)  Requirements determination.  Assists the TRADOC FC in determining IMT implications during analysis of Army concepts and CCPs.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 6

U.S. Army Combined Arms Center

 

6-1.  Mission of CAC.  The CG, CAC provides leadership and supervision for leader development and professional military and civilian education; institutional and collective training; functional training; training support; battle command; doctrine; collection, analysis, and integration of lessons learned; and specified areas CG, TRADOC designates in order to serve as catalyst for change and to support developing relevant and ready land formations with campaign qualities in support of the joint force commander.

 

6-2.  Organization of CAC.  The CAC consists of a HQ element and five major organizational elements: Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate (CADD); Combined Arms Center - Training (CAC-T); Command and General Staff College (CGSC); TRADOC Program Integration Office Battle Command (TPIO BC); and Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL).  The CG, CAC has direct authority over the following aligned TRADOC centers and schools:  the U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center (MANSCEN), which consists of the U.S. Army Chemical School (USACMLS), U.S. Army Engineer School (USAES), and U.S. Army Military Police School (USAMPS); U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and School (USAADACS); U.S. Army Armor Center (USAARMC); U.S. Army Aviation Center (USAAVNC); U.S. Army Field Artillery Center and Fort Sill (USAFACFS); U.S. Army Infantry Center (USAIC); U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School and Fort Huachuca (USAIC&FH); U.S. Army Signal Center (USASC); U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA); and the Warrant Officer Career Center (WOCC).  The CAC also has direct authority over the following three special activities:  Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC); WHINSEC; and USDB        (see fig 6-1).

 

Figure 6-1Combined Arms Center

 

6-3Lead responsibilities of CAC.  The CAC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  Functional training.  Manages processes to execute training courses for individuals that require additional skills and qualifications for job performance, which includes analyzing new training requirements due to organizational design and equipment or system changes.  The HQ TRADOC DCSOPS&T provides CG, CAC the staff support for functional training.

 

         (2)  Leader development and education.  Assesses, recommends, and executes programs for OES, WOES, NCOES, and CES and develops the joint mindset within all Army personnel, synchronizing Army leader development and education with DoD objectives for Joint Professional Military Education.

 

         (3)  Collective training.  Manages training requirements identification and resource allocation and supports training development for Army collective training to train units and leaders to conduct the full range of military operations in the contemporary operational environment.  Develops all facets of support to combined arms training, to include combined arms and collective training strategies, constructive and virtual training simulations, simulations that support RDA, ACR, and TEMO communities, LVC TE, and unit training management. In support of CG, TRADOC and HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7, manages the CTC Program (BCTP, Joint Readiness Training Center, National Training Center, Combat Maneuver Training Center, and exportable training capabilities), to include requirements, resourcing, policy, and standardization.  Executes the Battle Command Training Program.  Develops and sustains the homestation master plan for training capabilities and enablers, and the CTC master plan, in support of the Army Training Strategy.  Conducts joint air-ground training.  Develops training support to assist battle command/battle staff readiness requirements in the three training domains.

 

         (4)  Doctrine.  Develops (researches, writes, coordinates, and produces) Army doctrine for all echelons; integrates specified joint, multinational, and multi-Service doctrine; and integrates (ensures consistency of terms, presentation, and TTP) Army doctrine for all echelons.

 

         (5)  Training support.  Develops and synchronizes the Army's institutional, self-development, and operational domain training strategies to identify training support requirements that support force readiness.  The CAC recommends priorities and develops and manages training support enablers in collaboration with TRADOC MSCs and TRADOC FC.  The HQ TRADOC DCSOPS&T provides CG, CAC the staff support for training support.

 

         (6)  Lessons learned.  Using embedded liaison officer (LNO) cells within forward-deployed units conducting actual operations, LNO cells at the CTCs, and mobile training teams facilitates real-time sharing of lessons learned information across the Army.  Performs detailed DOTMLPF analysis on available data and works with individual leaders, Soldiers, unit staffs, MACOMs, and the HQDA staff to identify key Army issues and assists in developing both near-term and long-term solutions.  Conducts direct liaison with the HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7 lessons learned cell in support of the Army's input to the JCIDS process and represents Army lessons learned activities within both the joint and multinational communities.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Command and control (includes battle command).  In coordination with TRADOC FC, experiments with battle command initiatives, identifies gaps, and develops integrated capabilities that allow transition from the Army Battle Command System to joint command and control; develops and implements a battle command migration strategy in order to facilitate interoperability and enhance capabilities; and integrates and standardizes tactical operation center capabilities.  Facilitates the overall coordination, synchronization, integration, and routine reporting of TRADOC schools' A2C2 actions.  Integrates all A2C2 DOTMLPF requirements for the force within TRADOC and provide staff management of A2C2-related activities.  Develops and maintains the Battle Command Knowledge System to support training, leader development and education, battle command, and doctrine.

 

         (2)  LandWarNet warfighter mission area.  Integrates and synchronizes warfighting capabilities within TRADOC.  Provides the co-chair for the LandWarNet Board of Directors with Director, TRADOC FC.

 

         (3)  Personnel recovery (PR).  Reviews, prepares, integrates, and synchronizes PR into Army and joint doctrinal publications; integrates PR capabilities into organizations; develops and integrates PR education into the professional military education system including DoD civilians and contractors; assesses and identifies materiel requirements to support PR; assesses, recommends, and certifies facilities including modified survival, evasion, resistance, and escape training facilities; and assesses and develops PR simulations to support training of commanders and staff, units, and individuals.

 

         (4)  Force protection.  Develops white papers and requirements for the protection and preservation of combat power of operational Army units in contact.

 

         (5)  Army Digital Training Strategy (ADTS).  Develops strategy by which the Army trains battle command (BC) using digital BC systems.  The ADTS trains individual and collective (unit and staff) skills for all digital BC systems.  It is a four-phased training strategy consisting of:  establish skills, maintain skills, improve skills, and new equipment training.

 

         (6)  The CTC responsible official.  The DCG, CA is appointed by the CG, TRADOC, in accordance with AR 350-50, as the CTC responsible official for administration, validation, and integration of the CTC Program.  The CTC responsible official provides guidance, direction, and staff management for the preparation of the CTC master plan.

 

         (7)  Unit combined arms training strategies.  Lead for the Combined Arms Training Strategy (CATS) Program.  Manages CATS policy, requirements, and resources TRADOC-wide.  Manages CATS functionality in Digital Training Management System, Unit Training Management System, and Automated Systems Approach to Training.

 

         (8)  Stability and reconstruction operations (S&RO).  Develops S&RO white papers, identifies gaps in S&RO capabilities, and develops solutions across the DOTMLPF domains.

 

         (9)  Warrior Ethos.  Develops Warrior Ethos definition and standards in order to incorporate them into the Army culture through the DOTMLPF domains.

 

         (10)  Information operations (IO).  Develops and documents IO DOTMLPF requirements, manages personnel lifecycles for IO officers, and coordinates and teaches the IO qualification course.

 

         (11)  Army Modular Force.  Coordinates and integrates modular force-related DOTMLPF issues in support of Army transformation efforts.

 

         (12)  Network integration.  Ensures full integration of battle command, intelligence, and CSS federation of networks to leverage and enable interdependent network centric warfare within the JIM environment.

 

         (13)  Electronic warfare (EW).  Provides synchronization, integration, coordination, and decision authority for requirements determination for EW DOTMLPF requirements for the Army ICW TRADOC FC.

 

         (14)  Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive.  Integrates new and developing requirements for the five environments of weapons of mass destruction:  chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive ICW TRADOC FC.

 

         (15)  Combat identification (CID).  Conduct capabilities integration of the four joint CID environments:  surface-surface, surface-air, air-surface, and air-air ICW TRADOC FC.

 

6-4Assist responsibilities of CAC.  The CAC has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  IMT.  Assists USAAC with development of BOLC III.  Provides USAAC with what a Soldier must be prepared to learn on exiting IMT - what capabilities the soldier must possess to enter the Army Leader Development System.

 

         (2)  Concepts.  Assists TRADOC FC and proponents in developing concepts or CCPs IAW the ACDEP.

 

         (3)  Experimentation.  Assists TRADOC FC by supporting development of the ACDEP and ACDEP questions architecture to include recommending priorities.  Conducts and supports experiments IAW the ACDEP.  Assists TRADOC FC in exploring innovative methods of operation and conducts battle command experiments to substantiate the effects of proposed warfighting capabilities.

 

         (4)  Requirements determination.  Assists TRADOC FC in determining doctrine, leader development and education, and collective training implications during the JCIDS analysis of Army concepts and CCPs.  Assists TRADOC FC in assessing capabilities to identify battle command gaps and develop integrated battle command DOTMLPF requirements to resolve or mitigate those gaps.  Conducts JCIDS analysis of concepts and CCPs.  Develops JCIDS capability documents.

 

    b.  Key enablers

 

         (1)  Modeling & simulations.  Provides input on M&S capabilities and needs.  Assists development of simulations support plans by materiel developers.  Serves as the TEMO domain agent.

 

         (2)  Operational architecture.  Assists TRADOC FC in developing, integrating, validating, and maintaining operational architectures.

 

    c.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Organizational design.  Assists TRADOC FC with design of organizations for divisions, corps, and units of employment.

 

         (2)  Future warfare studies.  Assists TRADOC FC by supporting Army Title 10 wargames and other Service programs.

 

         (3)  Science & technology.  Assists TRADOC FC by supporting advanced concept technology demonstrations and advanced technology demonstrations.

 

         (4)  Spiral development.  Assists TRADOC FC by supporting capabilities gap analysis.

 

         (5)  Studies and analysis.  Assists TRADOC FC by supporting development of TSAP.

 

         (6)  Operational taskings.  Assists DCSOPS&T in supporting Worldwide Individual Augmentee System and the GWOT.  Executes other operational taskings as assigned.

 

         (7)  Resources.  Assists DCSRM by providing planning, programming, budgeting and execution process products and priority recommendations.

 

         (8)  Peacekeeping and stability operations.  Assists USAWC by supporting exchange of lessons learned with regard to strategic-level peacekeeping and stability operations.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 7

U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command

 

7-1.  Mission of CASCOM.  The CG, CASCOM provides logistics doctrine, organizations, training, leader development, and materiel solutions to sustain a campaign quality Army with joint and expeditionary capabilities in peace and war.

 

7-2.  Organization of CASCOM.  CASCOM consists of a headquarters and five aligned centers and schools.  The five aligned centers and schools are:  Quartermaster Center and School; Ordnance Center and School including the Ordnance Mechanical Maintenance School and Ordnance Missile and Electronic Maintenance School; the Transportation Center and School; the Soldier Support Institute including the Adjutant General School, the Finance School, the Recruiting and Retention School, and the School of Music; and the Army Logistics Management College (see fig 7-1).  The CASCOM is responsible for integrating DOTMLPF efforts with one TRADOC center and school (Chaplain Center and School) and two non-TRADOC centers and schools (Army Medical Department Center and School and Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School).

 

Figure 7-1.  Combined Arms Support Command

 

7-3.  Lead responsibilities of CASCOMCASCOM has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:  CASCOM does not have TRADOC lead for any of the 11 TRADOC core functions, but is the TRADOC lead for the logistics dimension of many core functions.  Examples include functional training, leader development and education, collective training, doctrine, concepts, experimentation, and requirements determination.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Designs, develops, and integrates logistics into warfighting requirements, fosters innovation in logistics, and leads change for the future logistics force.

 

         (2)  Provides vision, priorities, and guidance to five centers and schools.  Develops comprehensive, integrated, and effective logistics solutions for the Army through coordination with Army Materiel Command, Army Medical Department Center and School, Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School, Chaplain Center and School, and CASCOM subordinate activities.

 

         (3)  Serves as Army lead for logistics transformation.  Works with HQDA DCS, G-4, Army Materiel Command, TRADOC FC, and CAC to produce agile, comprehensive, and effective logistics policies, doctrine, organizations, and equipment.

         (4)  Serves as Army lead for distribution management.  Works with U.S. Transportation Command, Defense Logistics Agency, other Services, and the OSD to develop and implement joint, integrated end-to-end logistics processes.

 

7-4.  Assist responsibilities of CASCOMCASCOM has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  IMT.  Assists USAAC by providing training for Soldiers at CSS centers and schools.  Develops logistics-related IMT instruction for TRADOC's centers and schools.

 

         (2)  Functional training.  Trains recruiters for the CSS mission area ICW USAAC; provides position or specialty training at CSS centers and schools ICW CAC; and sets standards and ensures execution to standard for logistics-related individual training, including individual training in all units, for those skills and tasks inherent in the functional training core function.

 

         (3)  Leader development and education.  Assists CAC by conducting CSS pre-command course and officer, warrant officer, and NCO courses.  Sets standards and ensures execution to standard for logistics-related individual training, including individual training in all units ICW CAC, for those skills and tasks inherent in the leader development and education core function.

 

         (4)  Lessons learned.  Assists CAC by evaluating and integrating logistics lessons learned in training and products for all TRADOC centers and schools.  Integrates other lessons learned into training at CSS centers and schools.

 

         (5)  Collective training.  Assists CAC by providing logistics collective training programs and products for crews, teams, staffs, and units.

 

         (6)  Doctrine.  Assists CAC by developing logistics doctrine and providing CSS-related inputs for other doctrine development.

 

         (7)  Training support.  Assists CAC by providing training support capabilities at CSS centers and schools.  Enables logistics training in units and at other centers and schools.

 

         (8)  Concepts.  Assists TRADOC FC with Army concept development and supports joint concept development through TRADOC and non-TRADOC centers and schools.  Ensures the integration of land force logistics capabilities in the development of joint operating, functional, and integrating concepts ICW TRADOC FC, and joint partners.

 

         (9)  Experimentation.  Assists TRADOC FC by developing, coordinating, prioritizing, and directing execution of logistics experimentation through TRADOC and non-TRADOC centers and schools.  Synchronizes and integrates Army logistics experimentation with TRADOC FC and plans and coordinates Army participation in joint logistics wargames.

 

         (10)  Requirements determination.  Assists TRADOC FC in execution of the JCIDS by managing implementation and execution within CASCOM.  Coordinates, synchronizes, and integrates Army logistics capabilities developments with other MACOMs, the combatant commands, the Joint Staff, and other Service development agencies ICW TRADOC FC.

 

               (a)  Identifies and refines required logistics capabilities for the future force.

 

               (b)  Uses the JCIDS analysis by CSS centers and schools to identify gaps ICW TRADOC FC in joint and Army capabilities and proposes materiel or nonmateriel approaches to resolve or mitigate those gaps.

 

               (c)  Assists in the development of JCIDS capability documents (ICD, CDD, CPD, and DCR) that propose DOTMLPF solutions to logistics capability gaps.

 

               (d)  Coordinates, staffs, and validates JCIDS capability documents and forwards CASCOM-validated capability documents to TRADOC FC.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  BC.  Experiments with BC initiatives ICW TRADOC FC and CAC; provides standardized Battle Command Sustainment Support System capabilities throughout the Army; identifies CSS gaps and develops integrated capabilities that allow transition from the Battle Command Sustainment Support System to Joint Logistics Command and Control; develops and implements a migration strategy in order to facilitate interoperability and enhance CSS capabilities; and integrates and standardizes tactical operation center capabilities.

 

         (2)  The Army Modular Force.  Coordinates and integrates with CAC and joint partners on modular force-related DOTMLPF issues in support of Army logistics transformation efforts, which includes modular designs for corps and divisions, brigade combat teams, support brigades, theater sustainment commands, and interface with the national sustainment base.

 

         (3)  Network integration.  Assists CAC and Signal Center to ensure full integration of logistics and CSS federation of networks with battle command and LandWarNet to leverage and enable interdependent network centric operations within the JIM environment.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter  8

U.S. Army War College

 

8-1.  Mission of USAWC.  The Commandant, USAWC prepares selected military, civilian, and international leaders for the responsibilities of strategic leadership; educates current and future leaders on the development and employment of landpower in a joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (JIIM) environment; researches and publishes on national security and national military strategy; and engages in activities that support the Army's strategic communication efforts.

8-2.  Organization of USAWC.  The USAWC consists of the command group, HQ USAWC staff, College, Strategic Studies Institute, Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, and Chief Information Office.  The Army Physical Fitness Research Institute, a subcommand of the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, is attached to the USAWC to support its mission (see fig 8-1).

Figure 8-1.  U. S. Army War College

 

8-3.  Lead responsibilities of USAWC.  The USAWC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:  None.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Serves as the U.S. Army's strategic analysis and research center for the assessment and development of strategic thought for the employment of land power in joint and combined military operations and publishes research products to promulgate its analysis.

 

         (2)  Conducts strategic communications programs and exercises, seminars, and simulations to support its research and analysis and the Army's senior leaders, combatant commanders, and interagency organizations that benefit the U.S. Army and the Nation.

 

8-4.  Assist responsibilities of USAWC.  The USAWC has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:  Assists in leader development and education and educates and develops current and future leaders (senior Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, DoD civilians, and international officers) on strategic leadership and the development and strategic employment of land power in a JIIM environment.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 9

TRADOC Analysis Center

 

9-1.  Mission of TRAC.  Director, TRAC provides relevant, credible analysis to inform decisions about the Army's most important and challenging issues.  TRAC serves as the principal analytical organization of TRADOC.  TRAC provides centralized leadership and management of analysis for combat, training, and doctrinal developments.  TRAC conducts studies and analyses for TRADOC and HQDA; conducts studies of the integrated battlefield related to doctrine, organization, training, materiel, and leadership; designs and develops models and simulations for capabilities developments; manages technical exchange programs at the national and international levels; provides analytical support to TRADOC FC, centers, and schools; directs research related to analysis; establishes, maintains, and manages the databases, scenarios, models, and wargaming tools required to support analyses and studies; and reviews and certifies, as directed, the quality of TRADOC studies before their approval.

 

9-2.  Organization of TRAC.  TRAC consists of a HQ staff and four subordinate centers.  TRAC-FLVN, is co-located with HQ TRAC at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  TRAC-WSMR is located at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.  TRAC-LEE is located at Fort Lee, Virginia.  TRAC-MTRY is located at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.

 

 

 

Figure 9-1.  TRADOC Analysis Center

 

 

9-3.  Lead responsibilities of TRAC.  TRAC has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:  None.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Leads analysis for major Army experiments.

 

         (2)  Develops scenarios to support TRADOC experiments, studies, and analysis for capabilities developments.

 

         (3)  Develops, configuration manages, and applies verified and validated M&S.

 

         (4)  Researches battlefield phenomenology to improve modeling and analyses.

 

9-4.  Assist responsibilities of TRAC.  TRAC has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  IMT, functional training, and training support.  Performs training effectiveness analyses to assist USAAC and CAC in developing or improving training; performs analysis to underpin requirements for TADSS; assesses the application of new training or training delivery systems; supports Army field exercises, trials, and experiments; and conducts analysis of alternatives (AoA) of training programs.

 

         (2)  Leader development and education.  Director, TRAC serves as the TRADOC Civilian Career Program Manager for Engineers and Scientists (Non-Construction) and advises the operations research and systems analysis officer proponent.

 

         (3)  Doctrine.  Assists CAC by conducting studies of emerging and changing doctrine.

 

         (4)  Concepts.  Assists TRADOC FC by conducting analyses of Army future force concepts and CCPs and by developing scenarios that depict future force operations IAW emerging concepts and CCPs.

 

         (5)  Experimentation.  Assists TRADOC FC by conducting analyses of major TRADOC experiments IAW the ACDEP and by supporting experimentation with database management, scenario development, simulations, and certification of analytic results.

 

         (6)  Requirements determination.  Assists TRADOC FC by conducting studies and analyses that inform key TRADOC, Army, and Joint Staff decisions pertaining to requirements for capabilities integration and development.  Performs AoA, key performance parameter, and other requirements analyses in collaboration with TRADOC centers, schools, and battle labs.

   

     b.  Key enablers.

 

         (1)  Operational architecture.  Assists TRADOC FC by conducting studies and analyses that inform decision makers about operational architectures.

         (2)  Models and simulations.  Assists TRADOC FC by developing, configuration managing, and applying verified and validated M&S.

 

         (3)  Operational environment.  Assists TRADOC DCSINT by developing and maintaining TRADOC standard scenarios ICW TRADOC FC to ensure accurate representation of the OE.

 

    c.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  Maintains liaison and information exchange with national and international research and technical organizations.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 10

U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency

 

10-1.  Mission of USANCA.  The Director, USANCA provides nuclear and chemical technical expertise in support of all Army elements and to other U.S. Government and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) agencies, as requested.

 

10-2.  Organization of USANCA.  USANCA consists of a HQ and four subordinate divisions:  Operations, Nuclear, Chemical, and Technical Support.

 

10-3.  Lead responsibilities of USANCA.  USANCA has the following lead responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core Functions:  None.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:

 

         (1)  Establishes Army nuclear and nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) contamination survivability criteria and provides the Chairman for the Nuclear and Chemical Survivability Committee Secretariat.

 

         (2)  Ensures DoD international standardization of all NBC matters including NATO NBC (nonmedical) working groups.

 

         (3)  Provides the Army representative to the Joint (DoD and Department of Energy) Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and Safety Committee.

 

         (4)  Executes the Army Reactor Program; operates and directs the Army Reactor Office, and provides the chairman for the Army Reactor Council; and issues permits, examines, and certifies all Army active and decommissioned nuclear reactors.

 

         (5)  Provides the Army's capability to plan the employment of U.S. and NATO nuclear operations.

 

         (6)  Provides specialized, three-man Nuclear Employment Augmentation Teams to augment Army component command, joint forces land component command, or combatant command staffs as requested.

 

         (7)  Conducts staff assistance visits to Army NBC sites to assist with compliance and understanding of Army surety regulations, as requested.

 

         (8)  Maintains a database of trained personnel and maintains the equipment to conduct a nuclear disablement mission.

 

         (9)  Serves as personnel proponent for Nuclear and Counterproliferation Officer functional area and Theater Nuclear Planner additional skill identifier.

 

10-4.  Assist Responsibilities of USANCA.  USANCA has the following assist responsibilities:

 

    a.  Core functions:

 

         (1)  Functional training.  Prepares and administers the Nuclear and Counterproliferation Officer Course and the Theater Nuclear Operations Course.

 

         (2)  Collective training.  Assists CAC by augmenting the BCTP with personnel that have expertise in combating weapons of mass destruction.

 

         (3)  Doctrine.  Assists CAC by maintaining Joint Publication 3-12.1.

 

    b.  Other major responsibilities/tasks:  None.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Chapter 11

U.S. Army Aeronautical Services Agency

 

11-1.  Mission of USAASA.  The Commander, USAASA serves as the HQDA DCS, G-3/5/7 Executive Agent for Airspace, Aeronautical Information, Air Traffic Control, Notice to Airmen and Flight Procedures Policy; serves as the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment Executive Agent for joint-civil use of Army airfields and heliports; is the designated Army staff functional proponent for Army airfields and heliports and HQDA DCS,  G-2 Executive Agent for aviation weather policy; represents HQDA at the national and international level for airspace and aeronautical matters; provides HQDA representation to the Federal Aviation Administration's national headquarters and seven regional headquarters; and provides aeronautical services to Army forces worldwide.

 

11-2.  Organization of USAASA.  USAASA consists of a Commander, Administration/Resource/Security Branch, Airspace Support Division, with eight regional field offices, and an Aeronautical Information Division.

______________________________________________________________________________

Chapter 12

Coordinating Instructions

 

12-1.  Coordination and taskings.  This section provides guidance on coordination and taskings.

 

    a.  Coordination.  TRADOC's unique culture and structure make communications and coordination both a priority and a challenge.  Communications and coordination are tasks that affect everything TRADOC does.  The following considerations are included to assist in ensuring effective communications and coordination:

 

         (1)  Within the lead and assist framework, the lead organization has the inherent responsibility to ensure the accomplishment of all required communications and coordination, both within the parent organization, with external and higher organizations, and across TRADOC, before recommending approval of policy or guidance, generating a tasking, or beginning to implement a command initiative.

 

         (2)  Balance the extent of coordination against the time available for the input.  That is, coordination required in a short period of time must include, as a minimum, the organizations affected by the outcome or that have information that could affect the potential decision.  Similarly, limiting the number of organizations that coordinate on a product to generate a faster response, but omitting an organization that has a new or different perspective which improves the capability or initiative is not in the best interests of TRADOC.

 

         (3)  Examine actions to determine whether they involve routine coordination or require a tasking.  If the action requires coordination outside of the originating organization, the originator must balance the additional workload and the level of coordination needed before deciding whether to work through the DCSOPS&T tasking channel.  Synchronization and integration between action officers, across organizational boundaries, would represent routine coordination not generating a tasking.  The same holds true for division-level coordination, across organizational boundaries, in the development or staffing of guidance, policy, or an initiative.

 

    b.  Taskings.

 

         (1)  The tasking authorities in TRADOC are the CG, DCG/CofS, SGS, and the DCSOPS&T.

 

         (2)  For actions developed within TRADOC that require tasking, the responsibility to develop the tasking lies with the lead organization.  The lead organization conducts mission analysis, course of action development, decision making, and production of the tasking.  It is then processed through the DCSOPS&T.

 

         (3)  The SGS will process, disseminate, and track to completion taskings the CG, TRADOC and the DCG/CofS develop, all congressional taskings, and White House inquiries.  Upon assigning a tasking, the SGS will inform DCSOPS&T.

         (4)  Send all operational and organizational taskings, that agencies external to TRADOC develop, to the DCSOPS&T for processing, synchronization, dissemination, and tracking to completion.  Similarly, send taskings developed internally within TRADOC, except those the SGS processes, as described in subparagraph (3) above, to the DCSOPS&T.

 

         (5)  Process actions and taskers that meet one of the following criteria through the DCSOPS&T:

 

               (a)  Taskings originating from outside TRADOC.

 

               (b)  Taskings external to originator's organization; for example, from one TRADOC MSC to another; from a TRADOC MSC to the HQ TRADOC staff; from the HQ TRADOC staff to a MSC; from a TRADOC MSC, or HQ TRADOC staff to a special activity; or from one HQ TRADOC staff office to another.

 

               (c)  Taskings external to originator's organization that request formal concurrence/comment.  This does not preclude action officer to action officer informal coordination.

 

               (d)  Taskings that involve changes in policy or generate new policy.

 

    c.  External coordination.  The HQ TRADOC staff is the primary interface with external agencies (DoD, HQDA, joint organizations, other Services, and others) to provide TRADOC positions and receive taskings and requests for support.

 

    d.  TRADOC positions.  Command positions on issues, policies, or future concepts being presented to HQDA or other external organizations will be approved by CG, TRADOC or the DCG/CofS, particularly when TRADOC's command position is not in agreement with a recommendation from the originating agency or activity.

 

    e.  Similarly, Memorandums of Understanding and Memorandums of Agreement between outside organizations and TRADOC organizations will be approved by the DCG/CofS to ensure HQ TRADOC is part of the coordination or decision process for these types of arrangements.

 

12-2.  Supporting regulations.

 

    a.  Table 12-1 lists this regulation's supporting organization and function regulations and the lead for developing and maintaining each regulation.

 

Table 12-1

TRADOC 10-5-series regulations

Supporting Regulation

Lead Organization

TR 10-5-1

DCSRM

TR 10-5-2

TRADOC FC

TR 10-5-3

USAAC

TR 10-5-4

CAC

TR 10-5-5

CASCOM

TR 10-5-6

USAWC

TR 10-5-7

TRAC

 

    b.  Lead organizations will deconflict their regulation with other organizations.  The HQ TRADOC staff will assist in synchronization and deconfliction.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Appendix A

References

 

Section I

Required Publications

 

AR 5-22

The Army Proponent System

 

AR 600-3

The Army Personnel Proponent System

 

TR 71-12

TRADOC System Management

 

Section II

Related Publications

 

AR 1-20

Legislative Liaison

 

AR 5-5

Army Studies and Analyses

 

AR 5-11

Management of Army Models and Simulations

 

AR 10-5

Headquarters, Department of the Army

 

AR 10-16

United States Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency

 

AR 10-87

Major Army Commands in the Continental United States

 

AR 11-7

Internal Review and Audit Compliance Program

 

AR 20-1

Inspector General Activities and Procedures

 

AR 25-1

Army Knowledge Management and Information Technology Management

 

AR 25-52

Authorized Abbreviations, Brevity Codes, and Acronyms

 

AR 27-1

Judge Advocate Legal Services

 

AR 70-1

Army Acquisition Policy

 

AR 71-9

Materiel Requirements

 

AR 71-11

Total Army Analysis

 

AR 71-32

Force Development and Documentation - Consolidated Policies

 

AR 350-1

Army Training and Education

 

AR 350-50

Combat Training Center Program

 

AR 360-1

The Army Public Affairs Program

 

AR 380-5

Department of the Army Information Security Program

 

AR 385-10

Army Safety Program

 

AR 690-12

Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action

 

AR 690-600

Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints

 

AR 700-127

Integrated Logistics Support

 

AR 750-1

Army Materiel Maintenance Policy

 

AR 870-5

Military History: Responsibilities, Policies, and Procedures

 

AR 870-20

Army Museums, Historical Artifacts, and Art

 

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction (CJCSI) 3170.01E

Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System

 

CJCSI 3180.01

Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) Programmatic Processes for Joint Experimentation and Joint Resource Change Recommendations

 

CJCS Manual 3170.01B

Operation of the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System

 

DODD 5100.1

Functions of the Department of Defense and Its Major Components

 

FM 7-0

Training the Force

 

Joint Publication 1-02

DoD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

 

Joint Publication 3-12.1

Joint Tactics, Techniques and Procedures for Theater Nuclear Planning

 

TR 25-30

Preparation, Production, and Processing of Armywide Doctrinal and Training Literature (ADTL)

 

TR 350-6

Enlisted Initial Entry Training (IET) Policies and Administration

 

TR 350-10

Institutional Leader Training and Education

TR 350-13

Instruction in Military History

 

TR 870-1

TRADOC Military History Program

 

TRADOC Memorandum 1-3

Distinguished Visitors to HQ TRADOC

 

TRADOC Memorandum 1-11

Staff Procedures

 

Section III

Referenced Forms

 

DA Form 1045

Army Ideas for Excellence Program (AIEP) Proposal

 

DA Form 2028

Recommended changes to Publications and Blank Forms

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Glossary

 

Section I

Abbreviations

 

ACDEP                       Army Concept Development and Experimentation Plan

ACR                            advanced concepts requirements

ADCON                      administrative control

ADTS                          Army Digital Training Strategy

AGR                            Active Guard Reserve

AIT                              advanced individual training

AIEP                            Army Ideas for Excellence Program

AMA                           analysis of materiel/non-materiel approaches

AoA                             analysis of alternatives

AR                               Army regulation

ARNG                         Army National Guard

ATSC                          Army Training Support Center

BC                               battle command

BCT                             basic combat training

BCTP                          Battle Command Training Program

BLCSE                        Battle Lab Collaborative Simulation Environment

BOD                            board of directors

 

BOLC                          Basic Officer Leadership Course

CAC                            U.S. Army Combined Arms Center

CAC-T                        Combined Arms Center - Training

CADD                         Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate

CALL                          Center for Army Lessons Learned

CAO                            Congressional Activities Office

CASCOM                   U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command

CATS                          Combined Arms Training Strategy

CBA                            capabilities-based assessment

CCP                            concept capability plan

CDD                            capability development document

CES                             Civilian Education System

COE                            Contemporary Operating Environment

CG                               Commanding General

CGSC                          Command and General Staff College

CID                             Combat Identification

CIO                             Chief Information Officer

CP                               career program

CPA                            Chief of Public Affairs

CPD                            capability production document

CPG                            Commander's Planning Group

CSA                            Chief of Staff, U.S. Army

CSM                            Command Sergeant Major

CSO                            Command Safety Office

CSS                             combat service support

CTC                            combat training center

DA                               Department of the Army

DAIG                           Department of the Army Inspector General

DCG/CofS                   Deputy Commanding General/Chief of Staff

DCG, F                        Deputy Commanding General, Futures

DCG, USAR                Deputy Commanding General, United States Army Reserve

DCG, ARNG               Deputy Commanding General, Army National Guard

DCG, CA                    Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms

DCG, IMT                   Deputy Commanding General, Initial Military Training

DCR                            DOTMLPF change recommendation

DCS                            Deputy Chief of Staff

DCSINT                      Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence

DCSOPS&T                Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Training

DCSPIL                       Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Infrastructure, and Logistics

DCSRM                      Deputy Chief of Staff for Resource Management

DLIFLC                       Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

DoD                             Department of Defense

DOTMLPF                  doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education,

                                        personnel, and facilities

EEO                             equal employment opportunity

EW                              electronic warfare

FAA                            functional area analysis

FC                               Futures Center

FM                              field manual

FMSO                         Foreign Military Studies Office

FNA                            functional needs analysis

FOA                            field operating activity

FORSCOM                 U.S. Army Forces Command

FSA                             functional solution analysis

GOSC                         General Officer Steering Committee

GWOT                        Global War on Terrorism

HQ                              headquarters

HQDA                         Headquarters, Department of the Army

IAW                            in accordance with

ICD                             initial capabilities document

ICDT                           integrated capabilities development team

ICW                            in coordination with

IET                              initial entry training

IG                                inspector general

IM                               information management

IMT                             initial military training

IO                                information operations

IRAC                           internal review and audit compliance

ISR                              intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

IT                                 information technology

JCIDS                          Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System

JFCOM                       U.S. Joint Forces Command

JIIM                             joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational

JIM                              joint, interagency, and multinational

JKDDC                       Joint Knowledge Development and Distribution Capability

JNTC                           Joint National Training Capability

KM                              knowledge management

LNO                            liaison officer

LVC TE                       live, virtual, and constructive training environments

M&S                           modeling and simulations

MACOM                     major Army command

MANSCEN                 Maneuver Support Center

MDW                          Military District of Washington

MEPCOM                   Military Entrance Processing Command

MRB                            Mission and Resources Board

MSC                            major subordinate command

NATO                         North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NBC                            nuclear, biological, and chemical

NCO                           noncommissioned officer

NCOES                       Noncommissioned Officer Education System

NGB                            National Guard Bureau

OCS                            Officer Candidate School

OE                               operational environment

OES                             Officer Education System

OPFOR                       opposing forces

OSD                            Office of the Secretary of Defense

OSUT                          one station unit training

POI                              program of instruction

PR                               personnel recovery

RA                               Regular Army

RC                               reserve component

RDA                            research, development, and acquisition

ROTC                          Reserve Officer Training Corps

S&T                             science and technology

SATFA                        Security Assistance Training Field Activity

SGS                             Secretary of the General Staff

SIO                              senior intelligence officer

SJA                              Staff Judge Advocate

SMDC                         U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command

SMDR                         structure manning decision review

SRC                             Senior Resource Committee

S&RO                         stability and reconstruction operations

TAA                            Total Army Analysis

TADSS                        training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations

TASS                           The Army School System

TEMO                         training, exercises, and military operations

TJAG                           The Judge Advocate General

TLGOSC                     Training and Leader Development General Officer Steering Committee

TOMA                         Training Operations Management Activity

TPIO                           TRADOC Program Integration Office

TPIO BC                     TRADOC Program Integration Office Battle Command

TPO                             TRADOC Program Office

TR                               TRADOC regulation

TRAC                          TRADOC Analysis Center

TRADOC                    U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

TRAP                          training requirements arbitration panel

TSAP                           TRADOC Studies and Analysis Program

TSM                            TRADOC System Manager

TTP                             tactics, techniques, and procedures

UMT                            unit ministry team

UFMCS                       University of Foreign Military and Cultural Studies

USAAC                       U.S. Army Accessions Command

USAADACS               U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and School

USAARMC                 U.S. Army Armor Center

USAASA                     U.S. Army Aeronautical Services Agency

USAASB                     U.S. Army Accessions Support Brigade

USAAVNC                 U.S. Army Aviation Center

USACMLS                  U.S. Army Chemical School

USAES                        U.S. Army Engineer School

USAFACFS                U.S. Army Field Artillery Center and Fort Sill

USAIC                                    U.S. Army Infantry Center

USAIC&FH                U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School and Fort Huachuca

USAMPS                    U.S. Army Military Police School

USANCA                    U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency

USAR                          U.S. Army Reserve

USARC                       U.S. Army Reserve Command

USAREC                     U.S. Army Recruiting Command

USASC                       U.S. Army Signal Center

USATC                       U.S. Army Training Center

USAWC                      U.S. Army War College

USDB                          U.S. Disciplinary Barracks

WHINSEC                  Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation

WOCC                        Warrant Officer Career Center

WOES                         Warrant Officer Education System

 

Section II

Terms

 

Definitions of terms are found in Joint Pub 1-02.  This glossary defines terms requiring expanded explanation.

 

analysis of materiel/non-materiel approaches (AMA)

The AMA collates the information obtained during the functional area analysis (FAA), the functional needs analysis (FNA), the ideas for non-materiel approaches (DOTMLPF analysis), and the ideas for materiel approaches to determine the best materiel approach or combination of approaches to provide the desired capability or capabilities.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

architecture

A framework or structure that portrays relationships among all the elements of the subject force, system, or activity.  The structure of components, their relationships, and the principles and guidelines governing their design and evolution over time.  Architecture provides data sets that describe the missions and tasks that must be performed and for what purpose -- the operational view; the nodes and their characteristics that support the missions and tasks -- the system view; and how the nodes exchange information and interact to perform the desired effects associated with the tasks -- the technical view.

 

administrative control

Direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations in respect to administration and support, including organization of Service forces, control of resources and equipment, personnel management, unit logistics, individual and unit training, readiness, mobilization, demobilization, discipline, and other matters not included in the operational missions of the subordinate or other organizations.  Also called ADCON.  (Joint Pub 1-02)

 

capabilities-based assessment (CBA)

The CBA is the JCIDS analysis process that includes four phases: the functional area analysis, the functional needs analysis, the functional solution analysis, and the post independent analysis.  The results of the CBA are used to develop a joint capabilities document or initial capabilities document.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

capability

The ability to achieve a desired effect under specified standards and conditions through combinations of means and ways to perform a set of tasks.  It is defined by an operational user and expressed in broad operational terms in the format of a JCD, ICD, or a joint DCR.  In the case of materiel proposals, the definition will progressively evolve to DOTMLPF performance attributes identified in the CDD and the CPD.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

capability development document

A document that captures the information necessary to develop a proposed program(s), normally using an evolutionary acquisition strategy. The CDD outlines an affordable increment of militarily useful, logistically supportable and technically mature capability.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

capability documents

A generic term to refer collectively to ICDs, CDDs, CPDs, and DCRs.

 

capability gaps

The inability to achieve a desired effect under specified standards and conditions through combinations of means and ways to perform a set of tasks. The gap may be the result of no existing capability or lack of proficiency or sufficiency in existing capability.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

capability production document

A document that addresses the production elements specific to a single increment of an acquisition program.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

circulars

Command circulars contain material that is directive or informational, is transitory, or needs publishing only once.  Circulars expire 2 years from the date of issue or earlier.

 

concept

A notion or statement of an idea - an expression of how something might be done - that can lead to an accepted procedure (CJCSI 3010.02A).  A military concept is the description of methods (ways) for employing specific military attributes and capabilities (means) in the achievement of stated objectives (ends).

 

 

 

concept capability plan

The application of elements of operational joint and Army concepts to selected mission, enemy, terrain and weather, time, troops available, and civilian conditions.  It is typically more illustrative and descriptive than a concept and more focused in purpose.

 

contemporary operating environment

A generalized assessment of any adversary's strategies, capabilities, and TTP that may be used to engage U.S. forces.  A catalog of reasonable, feasible, and credible enemies in conjunction with the significant non-military environmental variables to challenge unit training objectives and drive leader development.

 

coordination

Consultation leading to an expressing of views.  To cause to act or work together for a common purpose, as in timing, unifying, and integrating work.

 

core function

Core functions are those critical major functions one or more organizations perform that accomplish TRADOC's mission.  Core functions are derived, sustainable components integral to the core competencies.  The core functions lay out the foundation or blueprint for designing the organization and assigning roles and responsibilities.

 

Devil's Advocate

An independent process or methodology to critically challenge concepts, doctrine, organizational designs, and technical capabilities.  Where feasible, subject matter experts from within the government, DoD, scientific, academic, industry, and international communities are integrated into the process to increase the rigor, depth, and quality of the analysis and findings.

 

direct authority

Broad authority to act on matters relating to the execution of an organization's assigned functions and responsibilities.  The latitude, direct authority provides, is bound by the overall commander's vision, priorities, and guidance, both written and verbal.  Direct authority is a measure of control less than that included within the term command and more than that included within the term ADCON.  Direct authority provides a leader the ability to influence the activities and initiatives of subordinate organizations but not to control day-to-day operations.

 

domain agent

Modeling and simulations domain agents support domain managers by gathering requirements, ensuring user requirements are understood and supported, and managing the domain review and approval process.  Domain agents are responsible for developing and maintaining a database of investment information for their assigned models and simulations.  They provide updates to the central investment database when the Army Modeling and Simulation Office requests, and manages the execution of approved investments.  (AR 5-11)

 

 

 

domain manager

Headquarters, DA designates a manager for each M&S domain.  Domain managers coordinate M&S activities and develop and maintain supporting plans for their domains, to include domain management plans and domain investment plans.  (AR 5-11)

 

DOTMLPF change recommendation

A recommendation for changes to existing joint resources when such changes are not associated with a new defense acquisition program.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

field operating activity

An organization which has the primary mission of executing policy and would still be required in the absence of the headquarters to which it reports (An activity is subordinate to MACOM level.).  (AR 71-32)

 

functional area analysis

The FAA is the first step of the JCIDS CBA.  It identifies the operational tasks, conditions, and standards needed to achieve military objectives.  It uses the national strategies, joint/Army concepts, the Unified Joint Task List and the Army Universal Task List, and the anticipated range of broad capabilities that adversaries might employ as input.  Its output is a list of capabilities their associated tasks and attributes to be reviewed in the follow-on FNA.  The FAA includes cross-capability analysis and cross-system analysis in identifying the operational task, conditions, and standards.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

functional needs analysis

The FNA is the second step of the JCIDS CBA.  It assesses the ability of the current and programmed joint and/or Army capabilities to accomplish the tasks, under the full range of operating conditions and to the designated standards that the FAA identified.  Using the tasks identified in the FAA as primary input, the FNA produces as output a list of capability gaps that require solutions and indicates the time frame in which those solutions are needed.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

functional solution analysis

The FSA is the third step of the JCIDS CBA.  The FSA is an operationally based assessment of potential DOTMLPF and policy approaches to solving (or mitigating) one or more of the capability gaps identified in the FNA.  The gaps identified in the FNA are inputs to the FSA; its outputs are potential solutions to resolve identified capability gaps.  In considering these approaches, the following order of priority is used:  changes to existing DOTMLPF and/or policy approach; product improvements to existing materiel or facilities alone; adoption of interagency or foreign materiel approaches that limited non-materiel DOTMLPF and/or policy consequences; and finally, new materiel starts.  The FSA is composed of three sub-steps:  ideas for non-materiel approaches (DOTMLPF analysis), ideas for materiel approaches, and the analysis of materiel/non-materiel approaches (AMA).  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

 

 

future operating environment

A forecast of the logical end state of the trends developed in the COE as they affect the employment of U.S., its allies, and joint forces.  Provides the basis for comparing concepts and developing requirements for future joint forces.  Considers "wild card" or unanticipated events or developments that may not be apparent in the COE in the context of potential adversaries.  Time period is the far end of the Defense Planning Guidance.

 

ideas for non-materiel approaches (DOTMLPF analysis)

As the first sub-step in the FSA, the DOTMLPF analysis determines whether a non-material approach or an integrated DOTMLPF and/or policy approach can fill the capability gaps identified in the FNA.  Non-materiel approaches include changes in DOTLPF.  If the analysis determines that the capability gap can be partially addressed by an integrated DOTMLPF and/or policy approaches, the proponent will assess them in conjunction with the potential materiel approaches.  If this approach is recommended, the proponent will develop a DCR in addition to required CDDs or CPDs.  If the analysis determines that the capability gap can be completely addressed by a non-materiel approach, the proponent will develop a DCR in lieu of completing the ICD.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

initial capabilities document

Documents the need for a materiel approach or an approach that is a combination of materiel and non-materiel to satisfy a specific capability gap(s).  It defines the capability gap(s) in terms of the functional area, the relevant range of military operations, desired effects, time, and DOTMLPF and policy implications and constraints.  The ICD summarizes the results of the DOTMLPF and policy analysis and the DOTMLPF approaches (materiel and non-materiel) that may deliver the required capability.  The outcome of an ICD could be one or more DCRs or CDDs.  (CJCSI 3170.01E)

 

institutional training

Institutional training and education courses qualify leaders for service in the Army, and provide them with the basic knowledge and skills needed to perform the duty position requirements of future operational assignments.  Institutional training and education usually precede a new level of operational assignment.  In each case, the institutional training base is the foundation upon which individuals develop their maximum potential.  (AR 350-1)

 

integration

The extent of coordination or interdependence that is needed within the organization in order to make effective, efficient decisions and successfully accomplish its roles, responsibilities, and functions.  There are three levels of integration:

 

·        Basic integration which is accomplished through published rules and procedures.  Integration is achieved through procedures and direct interaction is normally not required between organizational units.

·        Complex integration which is accomplished through an approved plan or order.  Interdependence is achieved through an operational plan or order in which the responsibility for and sequence of task accomplishment are specified in detail.

·        Highly complex integration which is the process of mutual adjustment in which closely coordinated contact is required within the management hierarchy (or chain of command) and which also implies cross-functional teams or individual integrators.

 

Each of these levels of integration is found in all Army organization to some extent.  Effective organizations facing more diverse environments or complex tasks or functions will use all of these integrative processes.

 

joint capabilities document

The JCD identifies a set of capabilities that support a defined mission area utilizing associated family of joint future concepts, CONOPS, or Unified Command Plan-assigned missions.  The capabilities are identified by analyzing what is required across all functional areas to accomplish the mission.  The gaps or redundancies are then identified by comparing the capability needs to the capabilities provided by existing or planned systems.  The JCD will be used as a baseline for one or more FSAs leading to the appropriate ICD or DCR, but cannot be used for the development of a CDD or CPD.  The JCD will be updated as changes are made to the supported family of joint future concepts, CONOPS, or assigned missions.  (CJCSM 3170.01B)

 

key enabler

A significant function that underpins the ability to execute two or more core functions.  An integral component of the set of functions or tasks required to execute a core function.  One or more organizations can perform this function.

 

major Army command

A command directly subordinate to, established by authority of, and specifically designated by Headquarters, Department of the Army.  Army component commands of unified and specified commands are major Army commands.  (AR 10-87)

 

major subordinate command

A command directly subordinate to, established by authority of, and specifically designated by a major command.

 

manage

To exercise formal, delegated authority to direct or monitor the activity of others in executing an aspect of the organizational mission or the appropriate use of resources (personnel, funds, materiel, facilities, information, time, or others).  Managing implies a degree of independent action or responsibility broader than staff management but does not conflict with the essential functions of the lead organization (developing, coordinating, and recommending policy, guidance, and taskings/tasks).

 

memorandum

Command memorandums apply to HQ TRADOC only.  They establish policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures; patterns of organizations and workflow; and recurring and special forms and reports within HQ TRADOC.  They are effective until superseded or rescinded.

 

modeling and simulation

A "model" is a mathematical, logical, physical, or procedural representation of some real or ideal system, and "modeling" is the process of developing a model.  A "simulation" is the implementation of a model in executable form or the execution of a model over time.  Taken together, "modeling and simulation" or M&S refers to the broad discipline of creating, implementing, understanding, and using models and simulations.

 

M&S facilitates early identification and reduction of the risks associated with complex system acquisition programs; helps to better understand what kinds of system requirements and architectures are feasible and affordable given various programmatic and technological constraints; and provides insight into how to better manage system engineering efforts so as to improve the overall likelihood of a successful acquisition effort.  (AR 5-11)

 

operational architecture

Portrays an operational warfighting concept.  A description (often graphical) of the operational elements, assigned tasks, and information flows required to accomplish or support a warfighting function.  It defines the type of information, the frequency of exchange, and what tasks these information exchanges support.

 

operational control

Operational control is the authority to perform those functions of command over subordinate organizations involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction necessary to accomplish the mission.  Operational control should be exercised through the commanders of subordinate organizations.  Operational control normally provides full authority to organize commands and forces and to employ those forces as the commander in operational control considers necessary to accomplish assigned missions; it does not, in and of itself, include authoritative direction for logistics or matters of administration, discipline, internal organization, or unit training.  (Joint Pub 1-02)

 

operational environment

The operational environment is defined as the "composite of conditions, circumstances, and influences that affect employment of military forces and bear on the decisions of the unit commander".  It is wide-ranging and geostrategic, encompassing geopolitics and globalization in economics, technology, and demographics, and incorporates both U.S. and threat military developments.  (Joint Pub 1-02)

 

pamphlet

Command pamphlets are permanent instructional or informational publications that apply commandwide.  Pamphlets are not directive.  They provide guidance and information needed to carry out policies and procedures established by regulations.  Forms established by pamphlets are for optional use only.

 

plan

A projected procedure for carrying out an undertaking.  A plan sets forth the specific tasks the participants will perform and includes policy and procedural guidance.  A plan differs from a program in that it may be less specific and normally does not schedule accomplishment or resource distribution within specified dates.  Planning normally precedes programming.

 

policy

A high-level overall plan embracing the general goals and acceptable procedures of an organization in light of given conditions to guide and determine present and future decisions.

 

program

An organized procedure for carrying out a mission.  Although its elements may vary considerably, it usually includes a statement of the mission, objectives to achieve within specific dates, priorities, provided resources, schedules to accomplish, progress indicators, and follow-on requirements.

 

regulation

Command regulations contain policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures relating to subjects not contained in ARs or which support or better define command guidance derived from ARs and DoD directives.  They are permanent directives, effective until superseded or rescinded.  Each regulation is confined to a single subject and is the only authority to prescribe mandatory use of command forms.

 

red teaming

A function executed by trained, educated, and practiced team members that provides commanders an independent capability to challenge plans, operations, and capabilities in the context of the operational environment and from our partners' and adversary's perspectives.

 

requirement

An established need justifying the timely allocation of resources to achieve a capability to accomplish approved military objectives, missions, or tasks.

 

staff management

The responsibilities of the staff to assist and coordinate lead organization efforts by analyzing, monitoring, assessing, and developing recommendations for the commander on all activities affecting policy, organization guidance, developmental processes, and implementation or execution processes in support of the organization meeting its mission.  The staff will facilitate the coordination and dissemination of plans, doctrine, and training with higher HQ and external agencies as appropriate.

 

strategic communications

Identifying and communicating with the internal and external organizations or audiences to achieve desired outcomes.  In doing so, the organization develops, synchronizes, and articulates key themes and messages in support of the strategic vision, goals, and objectives.  Strategic communications will inform a broad variety of audiences and ensure commandwide unity of effort.  Effective strategic communication not only serves TRADOC, but must support the Army and the joint communities in their strategic communications efforts.

 

strategic engagement

Interaction with stakeholders who potentially affect the ability of the joint community, the Army, or TRADOC to accomplish their strategic goals or mission.  Interaction includes deliberate communications activities with specific, concise, unifying, and consistent themes and messages, targeted at a specific stakeholder in a planned environment, using a designated messenger, that support a broader strategic communications plan.

 

strategic planning

The comprehensive process of an organization setting goals, developing strategies, and outlining tasks and schedules to accomplish its assigned mission within allocated resources.

 

supplement

Supplements contain policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures required to implement ARs.  It is the only medium authorized to provide subordinate commanders additional instructions to implement an AR.  Supplements do not supersede, change, or rescind any portion of an AR.

 

system

The combination of the components and subelements which function together as an entity to accomplish a given objective.  A system includes the hardware and all other required items, such as facilities, personnel, data, test measuring and diagnostic equipment, and training equipment.

 

user representative

The command or activity charged with the responsibility to ensure that combat and training developments are responsive to Army operational needs.

 

FOR THE COMMANDER:

 

OFFICIAL:                                                            ANTHONY R. JONES

                                                                              Lieutenant General, U.S. Army

                                                                              Deputy Commanding General/

                                                                                  Chief of Staff

 

 

              //*S//

JANE F. MALISZEWSKI

Colonel, GS

Chief Information Officer

 

 

 

 

 

*Original signed document is retained on file by the TRADOC CIO, Publications Officer